All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Empathy, Prejudice and Fostering Tolerance
Unformatted Document Text:  psychologists now tell us influences cognition (McGaugh 2003). We did so by examining a group often omitted in  discussions of the politics of difference, a group into which none of us is born, that each of us frantically tries to  avoid, that most of us – if we are very lucky – eventually move into and out of, depending on chance and situation,  and a group that all of us – if we are fortunate – desperately hopes to join eventually: the elderly.  Elders are treated differently by various cultures. Many UCI students were first­generation immigrants from  Asia or the Middle East, living in extended families, and highly sensitized to the ways elders are treated by different  cultures. Our study of these cultural differences attempted to help students disentangle what is “intrinsic” and  immutable about becoming old (the loss of physical vigor, for example) from what is not (decline in financial  resources, loss of a spouse), and to focus their attention on both the cultural differences and their own more  individual views of the elderly. We designed the study specifically to help students see that although some  attributes exist independently of social construction, many are culturally imposed and hence are neither intrinsic  nor immutable. A key goal in the course was helping students understand the normative political importance of  categorization and the according of moral salience to other groups in our society.  Before beginning their interviews, students considered what part of the elderly identity relates to differences  that are “real,” such as the declines in health, deaths of a spouse or friends, and which differences exist primarily in  the eyes of the beholder, such as those that occur when an otherwise sprightly older person is treated as infirm  simply because of white hair.  We intended this exercise to encourage students to ask whether some of the  differences other groups are said to have – often considered attributes that are “real” and that threaten our identity  – are socially constructed. Do we have more in common with, and thus less to fear from, others than we realize? 3  Answering this key question helped students understand the importance of categorization and the according of  5

Authors: Monroe, Kristen.
first   previous   Page 5 of 22   next   last



background image
psychologists now tell us influences cognition (McGaugh 2003). We did so by examining a group often omitted in 
discussions of the politics of difference, a group into which none of us is born, that each of us frantically tries to 
avoid, that most of us – if we are very lucky – eventually move into and out of, depending on chance and situation, 
and a group that all of us – if we are fortunate – desperately hopes to join eventually: the elderly. 
Elders are treated differently by various cultures. Many UCI students were first­generation immigrants from 
Asia or the Middle East, living in extended families, and highly sensitized to the ways elders are treated by different 
cultures. Our study of these cultural differences attempted to help students disentangle what is “intrinsic” and 
immutable about becoming old (the loss of physical vigor, for example) from what is not (decline in financial 
resources, loss of a spouse), and to focus their attention on both the cultural differences and their own more 
individual views of the elderly. We designed the study specifically to help students see that although some 
attributes exist independently of social construction, many are culturally imposed and hence are neither intrinsic 
nor immutable. A key goal in the course was helping students understand the normative political importance of 
categorization and the according of moral salience to other groups in our society. 
Before beginning their interviews, students considered what part of the elderly identity relates to differences 
that are “real,” such as the declines in health, deaths of a spouse or friends, and which differences exist primarily in 
the eyes of the beholder, such as those that occur when an otherwise sprightly older person is treated as infirm 
simply because of white hair.  We intended this exercise to encourage students to ask whether some of the 
differences other groups are said to have – often considered attributes that are “real” and that threaten our identity 
– are socially constructed. Do we have more in common with, and thus less to fear from, others than we realize?
Answering this key question helped students understand the importance of categorization and the according of 
5


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 5 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.