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Who Are You Wearing? Using the Red-Carpet Question Pedagogically
Unformatted Document Text:  (see Sample 6 in Appendix), or will use short multimedia clips to expand on points made in the readings from the book. I also keep a running list of important concepts and try to set aside the last few minutes of class to review highlights from the day (see Sample 3 in Appendix). This serves as a way of focusing students’ attention, and can also serve as a means of adding value to attending the class. Why? Because I let my class know that this is where a significant portion of material for the exam will come from. Once students become comfortable talking in class with regard to one aspect of the course (e.g., focused case discussion), they are much more likely to be forthcoming in less structured instances. Moreover, students can be important resources, too, as I have had more than one student point me to material that I have then used in subsequent classes. This creates a more dynamic classroom, and one that students can have a bigger part in shaping. III. Course Outcome Taken together, these various components provide a multivariate approach to covering material. In the particular case of asking, “Who are you wearing?” I was pleasantly surprised with the outcome of the class in general, and received quite a bit of positive feedback on the material dealing with the “closet experiment” in particular. However, we can evaluate the outcome of the course – and the clothing module – according to formal, informal, and personal metrics. From a purely formal standpoint, my evaluation scores for my class improved during the term I taught POL 124 “Politics of Global Inequality” in the manner discussed above. Normally, similar classes have lagged slightly behind “US Foreign Policy” (POL 130), which is another class I regularly teach and one for which I generally receive good 12

Authors: Carlson, Jon.
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(see Sample 6 in Appendix), or will use short multimedia clips to expand on points made
in the readings from the book. I also keep a running list of important concepts and try to
set aside the last few minutes of class to review highlights from the day (see Sample 3 in
Appendix). This serves as a way of focusing students’ attention, and can also serve as a
means of adding value to attending the class. Why? Because I let my class know that
this is where a significant portion of material for the exam will come from.
Once students become comfortable talking in class with regard to one aspect of
the course (e.g., focused case discussion), they are much more likely to be forthcoming in
less structured instances. Moreover, students can be important resources, too, as I have
had more than one student point me to material that I have then used in subsequent
classes. This creates a more dynamic classroom, and one that students can have a bigger
part in shaping.
III. Course Outcome
Taken together, these various components provide a multivariate approach to
covering material. In the particular case of asking, “Who are you wearing?” I was
pleasantly surprised with the outcome of the class in general, and received quite a bit of
positive feedback on the material dealing with the “closet experiment” in particular.
However, we can evaluate the outcome of the course – and the clothing module –
according to formal, informal, and personal metrics.
From a purely formal standpoint, my evaluation scores for my class improved
during the term I taught POL 124 “Politics of Global Inequality” in the manner discussed
above. Normally, similar classes have lagged slightly behind “US Foreign Policy” (POL
130), which is another class I regularly teach and one for which I generally receive good
12


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