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Who Are You Wearing? Using the Red-Carpet Question Pedagogically
Unformatted Document Text:  Diplomacy at Georgetown University ( www.guisd.org ) or from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government ( www.ksgcase.harvard.edu ), but other competent sites exist. Cases usually cost a few dollars and may be purchased as hardcopy via mail or for electronic download. For this module, I used Case #239: “Sweating the Swoosh – Nike, the Globalization of Sneakers, and the Question of Sweatshop Labor” by Michael Clancy, available from GUISD. Benefits of the case study method of teaching center around a four-step process. Students read the case study individually, along with discussion questions that they are to prepare (See Example 1 in Appendix). These questions ask the student to identify problems, issues, or analyze data, make decisions, and outline possible courses of action. The important part is that the questions form the framework around which the shared learning experience will occur, and can change depending on the instructor’s goals for the course or particular discussion. Second, the instructor may assign groups or teams to meet before class to go over the individual findings and reanalyze the output in a small- group setting. This allows an initial ‘dry run’ of discussion in a more comfortable setting for the student, and allows students the opportunity to become practiced at sharing their ideas. Remember, sometimes we forget that it’s not always easy talking in front of a large group of people; many individuals rank public speaking as their top fear. Third, with the assistance of the instructor, the collective input of the class is explored, ensuring everyone shares a common experience and that alternatives are considered. It is important for the instructor to act as mediator and guide, and to help promote the discussion; the bulk of the talking (75% or more) should be done by the students. Ask for clarification or assistance from classmates; “What do you think of 8

Authors: Carlson, Jon.
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Diplomacy at Georgetown University (
) or from Harvard’s Kennedy
School of Government (
), but other competent sites exist.
Cases usually cost a few dollars and may be purchased as hardcopy via mail or for
electronic download. For this module, I used Case #239: “Sweating the Swoosh – Nike,
the Globalization of Sneakers, and the Question of Sweatshop Labor” by Michael Clancy,
available from GUISD.
Benefits of the case study method of teaching center around a four-step process.
Students read the case study individually, along with discussion questions that they are to
prepare (See Example 1 in Appendix). These questions ask the student to identify
problems, issues, or analyze data, make decisions, and outline possible courses of action.
The important part is that the questions form the framework around which the shared
learning experience will occur, and can change depending on the instructor’s goals for the
course or particular discussion. Second, the instructor may assign groups or teams to
meet before class to go over the individual findings and reanalyze the output in a small-
group setting. This allows an initial ‘dry run’ of discussion in a more comfortable setting
for the student, and allows students the opportunity to become practiced at sharing their
ideas. Remember, sometimes we forget that it’s not always easy talking in front of a
large group of people; many individuals rank public speaking as their top fear.
Third, with the assistance of the instructor, the collective input of the class is
explored, ensuring everyone shares a common experience and that alternatives are
considered. It is important for the instructor to act as mediator and guide, and to help
promote the discussion; the bulk of the talking (75% or more) should be done by the
students. Ask for clarification or assistance from classmates; “What do you think of
8


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