All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Using Current Events to Develop Classroom Simulations
Unformatted Document Text:  student performance will be measured. I found that this type of simulation works best when used towards the end of a course. This is the time when students are more likely to have all of the tools they need to be able to combine theory with practice in the simulation. For the Uganda simulation in particular, students used many concepts they learned in class, including information on game theory, decision-making, negotiations, preferences, utility structures, the United Nations, and many other topics. Step 2: Simulation Logistics. For any simulation it is necessary to prepare some information for the students beforehand. Part one of this step is providing the students with general information, usually drawn from current news sources, that will help orient them to the topic under discussion. For the Uganda simulation, I provided the students with some background information on the conflict in Uganda in the form of a lecture in a single class period. Depending on the course, you can provide this material in the form of readings that the students do on their own, in a series of lectures, or even by using supplemental materials like video clips of news reports or a documentary. The Night Commuters is an excellent documentary on the plight of children in Uganda that may help bring the reality of the problem into the classroom. Part two of simulation logistics is providing the students with the specific roles they are to play in the simulation. In the Uganda simulation, there are five distinct groups represented at the negotiating table: the Ugandan government, the United Nations, the Lord's Resistance Army, an international nongovernmental organization, and a local peace group. I have found that it is more rewarding for the students if they work in small groups at this point, so I divide the class into groups of five, with each group made up of a representative from the major players in Uganda. These mini-groups then conduct their own negotiations. Having the students work in 4

Authors: Glazier, Rebecca.
first   previous   Page 4 of 13   next   last



background image
student performance will be measured. I found that this type of simulation works best when used
towards the end of a course. This is the time when students are more likely to have all of the
tools they need to be able to combine theory with practice in the simulation. For the Uganda
simulation in particular, students used many concepts they learned in class, including
information on game theory, decision-making, negotiations, preferences, utility structures, the
United Nations, and many other topics.
Step 2: Simulation Logistics. For any simulation it is necessary to prepare some
information for the students beforehand. Part one of this step is providing the students with
general information, usually drawn from current news sources, that will help orient them to the
topic under discussion. For the Uganda simulation, I provided the students with some
background information on the conflict in Uganda in the form of a lecture in a single class
period. Depending on the course, you can provide this material in the form of readings that the
students do on their own, in a series of lectures, or even by using supplemental materials like
video clips of news reports or a documentary. The Night Commuters is an excellent
documentary on the plight of children in Uganda that may help bring the reality of the problem
into the classroom.
Part two of simulation logistics is providing the students with the specific roles they are
to play in the simulation. In the Uganda simulation, there are five distinct groups represented at
the negotiating table: the Ugandan government, the United Nations, the Lord's Resistance Army,
an international nongovernmental organization, and a local peace group. I have found that it is
more rewarding for the students if they work in small groups at this point, so I divide the class
into groups of five, with each group made up of a representative from the major players in
Uganda. These mini-groups then conduct their own negotiations. Having the students work in
4


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 13   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.