All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Keeping It Real: Teaching Middle East Conflicts with Simulations
Unformatted Document Text:  I felt the best part of the simulation was the discussions the role players had, in particular [between] the Christians and the Shia, [when] the Shia exposed the State failures but both were searching for the "one true Lebanon" but just in different ways of getting to the end state. Students thought the simulation reflected the reality on the ground, and were struck by the real feel to the grievances expressed. It got a little "tense" - which made it more realistic.… the dynamics--real world--played out during the simulation. The PA groups were more about fighting with each other than focusing on providing a united front against Israel.The best part of the simulation was when the parties argued amongst themselves without outside (non-actor) involvement. I think that best illustrated the true difficulties that have thus far, prevented any real resolution of these troubled issues. This brought more than just a discussion, it brought in real emotion to the debate.I think we captured the same aspects which drive the debate today in Lebanon.Most of the participants added in enough emotion into their responses that it became easier to see how the real actors got caught up in and behaved in this mess. Creativity and Identification Students demonstrated much creativity in the researching and preparing for the simulations, a notable achievement especially for in student population since their profession does not often provide space for creativity. A representative of the Palestinians for the water conflict simulation brought in a bottle of brown water and asked the Israeli representative if he would himself drink it. Others dressed the part. One playing Bashir Gemayel came in dressed as the picture on his web site. Another playing Marwan Barghouti came handcuffed, as the web site shows him. A female officer playing Hamas came in veiled. The Palestinian checkpoints in particular struck the students. The representative of the average Palestinian came in late one year (waiting in the hallway), saying she was held up at a checkpoint. Another year a student playing the same group asked for permission to leave early in order to get across the checkpoint before it closed. This student portrayed the average Palestinian by bringing life to dull statistics: As "Joe Palestinian," he embodied the statistics for his group. I have this much education, this number of children, arrested this number of time, etc… This technique proved effective in demonstrating those affected by negotiations of which they are not a part. The representative of the Lebanese people in the 2006 war did likewise, putting in the first person the effects of that war. Students began to "picture" the conflict in terms of the simulation even after the class period ended. They often substituted the name of the student for the name of the group s/he represented when discussing it in future classes. Students overcame their hesitancy to view the conflict from the perspective of the local actors and argued from the standpoint of groups many of whom are deemed terrorist. The simulations provided for increased freedom of expression. Students could voice severe positions without fear of repercussions, and the quiet students became opposite in these simulations. 6

Authors: Baylouny, Anne.
first   previous   Page 6 of 14   next   last



background image
I felt the best part of the simulation was the discussions the role players had, in
particular [between] the Christians and the Shia, [when] the Shia exposed the
State failures but both were searching for the "one true Lebanon" but just in
different ways of getting to the end state.
Students thought the simulation reflected the reality on the ground, and were
struck by the real feel to the grievances expressed.
It got a little "tense" - which made it more realistic.
… the dynamics--real world--played out during the simulation. The PA groups
were more about fighting with each other than focusing on providing a united
front against Israel.
The best part of the simulation was when the parties argued amongst themselves
without outside (non-actor) involvement. I think that best illustrated the true
difficulties that have thus far, prevented any real resolution of these troubled
issues.
This brought more than just a discussion, it brought in real emotion to the debate.
I think we captured the same aspects which drive the debate today in Lebanon.
Most of the participants added in enough emotion into their responses that it
became easier to see how the real actors got caught up in and behaved in this
mess.
Creativity and Identification
Students demonstrated much creativity in the researching and preparing for the
simulations, a notable achievement especially for in student population since their
profession does not often provide space for creativity. A representative of the Palestinians
for the water conflict simulation brought in a bottle of brown water and asked the Israeli
representative if he would himself drink it. Others dressed the part. One playing Bashir
Gemayel came in dressed as the picture on his web site. Another playing Marwan
Barghouti came handcuffed, as the web site shows him. A female officer playing Hamas
came in veiled. The Palestinian checkpoints in particular struck the students. The
representative of the average Palestinian came in late one year (waiting in the hallway),
saying she was held up at a checkpoint. Another year a student playing the same group
asked for permission to leave early in order to get across the checkpoint before it closed.
This student portrayed the average Palestinian by bringing life to dull statistics: As "Joe
Palestinian," he embodied the statistics for his group. I have this much education, this
number of children, arrested this number of time, etc… This technique proved effective
in demonstrating those affected by negotiations of which they are not a part. The
representative of the Lebanese people in the 2006 war did likewise, putting in the first
person the effects of that war.
Students began to "picture" the conflict in terms of the simulation even after the
class period ended. They often substituted the name of the student for the name of the
group s/he represented when discussing it in future classes. Students overcame their
hesitancy to view the conflict from the perspective of the local actors and argued from the
standpoint of groups many of whom are deemed terrorist. The simulations provided for
increased freedom of expression. Students could voice severe positions without fear of
repercussions, and the quiet students became opposite in these simulations.
6


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 14   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.