All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Keeping It Real: Teaching Middle East Conflicts with Simulations
Unformatted Document Text:  à-vis one another, engaged in smuggling, drug running, etc. …the realism of motives. Everyone is concentrating on their own interests. …the complimentary nature of enemy interests: fighting served both their purposes. … how many times groups switched sides/changed alliances. I was very interested to learn that Syria was indeed acting in their own self-interest and not that of the Soviet Union.[The most striking thing was] how complex the situation is. … the intertwining of regional conflicts. [The most striking thing was] the domestic nature of conflicts.[The] U.S. is missing the domestic dimension of Lebanon's interaction with Israel.[The most striking thing was the] power struggle--representation of interests, elites, poor. Basic needs being met and individual economic growth is desired by all, but competing interests and distrust prevents groups from working together.… how provision of goods/state services is key. … how important/central issue that the state provision of goods and services is excluding Israel and Syria, each interest group focused on goods and services [The most striking thing I learned is] that civil wars are not just a 2 party conflicts - there are multiple sides. … difference between the Israeli state and Israelis.… that most Palestinians do not support the PA or identify with it. … I find it fascinating that they are not still fighting each other to this day (well, they are but not at the same scale). There are so many opposing sides with each having some common ground, but the differences causing them to pull triggers. … [that] after 1976, the fighting was within individual militias, not between them.… [the] whole situation around Palestinian refugees – [I] was not aware they are opposed to the PA. [I] came away with a better understanding of grievances overall. The best part was actually the overview of the water conflicts in the region and how they are related to the political disputes. Students were struck by the common goals of opponents and the similarities between the warring parties. [I was surprised by] how similar [the] positions were once [you] throw out [the] ethno/religious positions - all want same thing. … how opposition among Palestinians seemed to want all the same things. It's an example of domestic political weakness and discord preventing progress.… that common interests exist but sides are unable to pursue them. … that the Palestinians and Israelis share common interests but are unwilling/unable to pursue them. It didn’t play out all the way, but I was surprised to learn that to some degree, the interests of Syria and Israel were complementary. Syria's pursuit of self interest actually served Israeli interest in decreasing hostility to the north. New Questions and Policy Options Students reported that the simulations generated new questions and a desire to 9

Authors: Baylouny, Anne.
first   previous   Page 9 of 14   next   last



background image
à-vis one another, engaged in smuggling, drug running, etc.
…the realism of motives. Everyone is concentrating on their own interests.
…the complimentary nature of enemy interests: fighting served both their
purposes.
… how many times groups switched sides/changed alliances.
I was very interested to learn that Syria was indeed acting in their own self-
interest and not that of the Soviet Union.
[The most striking thing was] how complex the situation is.
… the intertwining of regional conflicts.
[The most striking thing was] the domestic nature of conflicts.
[The] U.S. is missing the domestic dimension of Lebanon's interaction with Israel.
[The most striking thing was the] power struggle--representation of interests,
elites, poor. Basic needs being met and individual economic growth is desired by
all, but competing interests and distrust prevents groups from working together.
… how provision of goods/state services is key.
… how important/central issue that the state provision of goods and services is
excluding Israel and Syria, each interest group focused on goods and services
[The most striking thing I learned is] that civil wars are not just a 2 party
conflicts - there are multiple sides.
… difference between the Israeli state and Israelis.
… that most Palestinians do not support the PA or identify with it.
… I find it fascinating that they are not still fighting each other to this day (well,
they are but not at the same scale). There are so many opposing sides with each
having some common ground, but the differences causing them to pull triggers.
… [that] after 1976, the fighting was within individual militias, not between them.
… [the] whole situation around Palestinian refugees – [I] was not aware they are
opposed to the PA.
[I] came away with a better understanding of grievances overall.
The best part was actually the overview of the water conflicts in the region and
how they are related to the political disputes.
Students were struck by the common goals of opponents and the similarities
between the warring parties.
[I was surprised by] how similar [the] positions were once [you] throw out [the]
ethno/religious positions - all want same thing.
… how opposition among Palestinians seemed to want all the same things. It's an
example of domestic political weakness and discord preventing progress.
… that common interests exist but sides are unable to pursue them.
… that the Palestinians and Israelis share common interests but are
unwilling/unable to pursue them.
It didn’t play out all the way, but I was surprised to learn that to some degree, the
interests of Syria and Israel were complementary. Syria's pursuit of self interest
actually served Israeli interest in decreasing hostility to the north.
New Questions and Policy Options
Students reported that the simulations generated new questions and a desire to
9


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 9 of 14   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.