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Unformatted Document Text:  To coin an advertising phrase: and don’t the kiddies love it! The students who sign up for East-West Diplomacy do not simply engage with the subject, they immerse themselves in it. Their relationships with their peers in the class spill over to daily and social life of students on campus. During September semester, it is not unusual for university staff to report out-of-class animated debates/negotiations, somewhere on campus, between members of a class cohort as they thrash out some of the finer political points before making a presentation in class. Teaching staff from the class find walking across campus a negotiated and occasionally treacherous path in September through December – not because of any prevailing weather conditions, but rather the encountered clusters of students representing different nations who are deeply engaged in the political machinations of any negotiation, and who will attempt to gain a leading edge by extracting intelligence from the teaching staff. By the end of semester, all the students know more about the 6-Party Talks and all the protagonists involved, than they ever thought they should rightly know. An in-depth knowledge of the 6-Party Talks is not going to directly assist them gain a job in a commercial Bank is it. Or is it? Students rarely do this subject for fun; they know it is too much work to be the traditional sense of ‘fun’. Rather they recognise that there is a very serious side to this subject that will assist them to be a valuable employee, regardless of their career field. In essence, the students who take this class recognise that the learning experience is not random. The class and the exercises therein, have been carefully crafted to ensure that learning pedagogies are sound for the student. The students also recognise that the class reflects a changed world for international relations and diplomacy; a world where practitioners in this field need to be equipped to deal with externalities that have hitherto not been imagined. The preparation and training of practitioners for such ‘real world’ contexts is the focus of my teaching in the International Relations and Diplomacy studies offered in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at Bond University. Contemporary conceptualisation of global politics and diplomatic methods has changed radically since the events of 11 September 2001, and whilst the threats to global cohesion are not necessarily any greater, they are now viewed through new lenses that amplify the role of Diplomacy in International Relations. With this in mind, Diplomacy and International Relations studies in Universities should now be charged with the responsibility to explore beyond the traditional domain of state-qua-state power politics and bi-lateral Embassy relations. Indeed the area studied needs to include an analysis of the broad range of official and non-official diplomats that now permeate government, business and private sectors of any nation. No longer are international relations only impacted by the official States. The individuals that flew civilian aircraft into New York’s Twin Towers ensured that teachers and theorists of diplomacy and international relations would never again ignore the power of individuals and non-state participants in the 21 st century global politics. Diplomacy studies carry another legacy that also needs to be eradicated in order to deliver best-practice methodologies. Diplomacy studies have traditionally worn the shroud mystery with areas of interest such as espionage, counter-espionage, codes, and the James Bond-esque cocktail parties with an agenda, highlighted in spy literature and movies. While the glamour of such activities is enticing for students, there are few practical vocational outcomes attached to those novel representations of the practice of diplomacy. Graduates of Diplomacy studies require practical training in daily work of diplomats and the state, or non-state, organisations they represent. Consequently the challenge for the Diplomacy teaching staff at Bond University has

Authors: Cullen, Anne.
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To coin an advertising phrase: and don’t the kiddies love it! The students who
sign up for East-West Diplomacy do not simply engage with the subject, they
immerse themselves in it. Their relationships with their peers in the class spill over to
daily and social life of students on campus. During September semester, it is not
unusual for university staff to report out-of-class animated debates/negotiations,
somewhere on campus, between members of a class cohort as they thrash out some of
the finer political points before making a presentation in class. Teaching staff from
the class find walking across campus a negotiated and occasionally treacherous path
in September through December – not because of any prevailing weather conditions,
but rather the encountered clusters of students representing different nations who are
deeply engaged in the political machinations of any negotiation, and who will attempt
to gain a leading edge by extracting intelligence from the teaching staff.
By the end of semester, all the students know more about the 6-Party Talks
and all the protagonists involved, than they ever thought they should rightly know.
An in-depth knowledge of the 6-Party Talks is not going to directly assist them gain a
job in a commercial Bank is it. Or is it? Students rarely do this subject for fun; they
know it is too much work to be the traditional sense of ‘fun’. Rather they recognise
that there is a very serious side to this subject that will assist them to be a valuable
employee, regardless of their career field.
In essence, the students who take this class recognise that the learning
experience is not random. The class and the exercises therein, have been carefully
crafted to ensure that learning pedagogies are sound for the student. The students also
recognise that the class reflects a changed world for international relations and
diplomacy; a world where practitioners in this field need to be equipped to deal with
externalities that have hitherto not been imagined. The preparation and training of
practitioners for such ‘real world’ contexts is the focus of my teaching in the
International Relations and Diplomacy studies offered in the Faculty of Humanities
and Social Sciences at Bond University.
Contemporary conceptualisation of global politics and diplomatic methods has
changed radically since the events of 11 September 2001, and whilst the threats to
global cohesion are not necessarily any greater, they are now viewed through new
lenses that amplify the role of Diplomacy in International Relations. With this in
mind, Diplomacy and International Relations studies in Universities should now be
charged with the responsibility to explore beyond the traditional domain of state-qua-
state power politics and bi-lateral Embassy relations. Indeed the area studied needs to
include an analysis of the broad range of official and non-official diplomats that now
permeate government, business and private sectors of any nation. No longer are
international relations only impacted by the official States. The individuals that flew
civilian aircraft into New York’s Twin Towers ensured that teachers and theorists of
diplomacy and international relations would never again ignore the power of
individuals and non-state participants in the 21
st
century global politics.
Diplomacy studies carry another legacy that also needs to be eradicated in
order to deliver best-practice methodologies. Diplomacy studies have traditionally
worn the shroud mystery with areas of interest such as espionage, counter-espionage,
codes, and the James Bond-esque cocktail parties with an agenda, highlighted in spy
literature and movies. While the glamour of such activities is enticing for students,
there are few practical vocational outcomes attached to those novel representations of
the practice of diplomacy. Graduates of Diplomacy studies require practical training
in daily work of diplomats and the state, or non-state, organisations they represent.
Consequently the challenge for the Diplomacy teaching staff at Bond University has


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