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Information Technology and International Relations: Using On Line, Interactive Simulations to Transcend Time, Space, and Attitudes
Unformatted Document Text:  move forms are posted on the web site (or bulletin board if there are technical problems) at a specific time on the day following the advisory group’s meeting. After the moves are posted, team members check the website (or bulletin board), meet with their country team members during the next class period, and continue the process of deliberation in preparation for the following move. This simulation involved four moves, with the last set of move forms presented in class as part of a debriefing process. Students in a lower division (sophomore) class, constituted the control group for this simulation. They read the book Essence of Decision (Allison and Zelikow, 1999) and devoted three class sessions to decision making during the crisis. These students did not experience the simulation. Both the control and the experimental groups were given quantitative pre-test questionnaires at the beginning of the course and post-test questionnaires at the end of the simulation. The pre-tests and post-tests to determine quantitative measures of attitudes involved sets of paired adjective scales, presented as follows: Table 1.1In addition, the experimental group was given qualitative pre- and post-simulation questionnaires asking the following: As you consider your perceptions about the Cold War, write some adjectives that describe your feelings. Write a paragraph that depicts what it might have been like to live during those times? Survey Results and Qualitative Evaluations Table 2 presents mean scores of paired adjective scales before and after the control group’s study of the Cuban Missile Crisis, showing no statistically significant changes in their attitudes toward the Cold War. Table 1.2 The experimental group’s data suggests a trend indicating changed feelings toward the Cold War after students’ participation in the simulation. The paired t test computed in SPSS indicates statistical significance. In three categories of paired adjectives, there is a trend in which subjects viewed the Cold War differently after their experience with the simulation. Respondents who participated in the simulation indicate that their feelings about the Cold War changed to the extent they thought it was a more fearful, risky, and dangerous era. Table 1.3 It is possible that these changes are due to the experimental group’s difference in education level and experience. It is also possible that the changes are an artifact of the

Authors: Stover, William.
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move forms are posted on the web site (or bulletin board if there are technical problems)
at a specific time on the day following the advisory group’s meeting.
After the moves are posted, team members check the website (or bulletin board), meet
with their country team members during the next class period, and continue the process
of deliberation in preparation for the following move. This simulation involved four
moves, with the last set of move forms presented in class as part of a debriefing process.
Students in a lower division (sophomore) class, constituted the control group for this
simulation. They read the book Essence of Decision (Allison and Zelikow, 1999) and
devoted three class sessions to decision making during the crisis. These students did not
experience the simulation. Both the control and the experimental groups were given
quantitative pre-test questionnaires at the beginning of the course and post-test
questionnaires at the end of the simulation. The pre-tests and post-tests to determine
quantitative measures of attitudes involved sets of paired adjective scales, presented as
follows:
Table 1.1
In addition, the experimental group was given qualitative pre- and post-simulation
questionnaires asking the following:
As you consider your perceptions about the Cold War, write some adjectives that
describe your feelings. Write a paragraph that depicts what it might have been like to
live during those times?
Survey Results and Qualitative Evaluations

Table 2 presents mean scores of paired adjective scales before and after the control
group’s study of the Cuban Missile Crisis, showing no statistically significant changes in
their attitudes toward the Cold War.
Table 1.2
The experimental group’s data suggests a trend indicating changed feelings toward the
Cold War after students’ participation in the simulation. The paired t test computed in
SPSS indicates statistical significance. In three categories of paired adjectives, there is a
trend in which subjects viewed the Cold War differently after their experience with the
simulation. Respondents who participated in the simulation indicate that their feelings
about the Cold War changed to the extent they thought it was a more fearful, risky, and
dangerous era.

Table 1.3
It is possible that these changes are due to the experimental group’s difference in
education level and experience. It is also possible that the changes are an artifact of the


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