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Information Technology and International Relations: Using On Line, Interactive Simulations to Transcend Time, Space, and Attitudes
Unformatted Document Text:  group provides a somewhat greater level of confidence in the quantitative findings, and the qualitative responses support the statistical data. Replication of this study and others would help lend greater reliability to findings about the effect of simulations on teaching and learning. Such replication is made easier by a website sponsored by Santa Clara University where on line simulations can be created and studied. The Conflict Resolution Simulation site http://www.scu.edu/crs presents several simulations and templates for creating new ones that can be shared by instructors of international studies and political science. The Cuban Missile Crisis Simulation, the subject of this paper, is found on this site. Additionally, the site presents a contemporary Middle East simulation that involves universities, faculty and students in Egypt, Lebanon, Israel, Morocco, and the United States. Instructors can join this simulation during the scheduled times or create their own version using the template on the site. A third deals with international legal adjudication that has been useful in the teaching of international law. Finally, the site contains a method for facilitating a dialog among Christians, Jews, and Muslims (Stover, 2005B; 2006). Using simulations like these that involve many countries as well as different types of students and universities over extended time periods, researchers can contribute to Krain’s challenge by developing new methods for teaching and learning and conducting studies that measure their effectiveness. References for The Cuban Missile Crisis Allison, G. and P. Zelikow (1999) Essence of Decision. New York: Addison Wesley. Ambrosio, T. (2004) “Bringing Ethnic Conflict into the Classroom: A Student-Centered Simulation of Multiethnic Politics.” Political Science and Politics 37(2): 285-289. ________ (2006) “Trying Saddam Hussein: Teaching International Law Through an Undergraduate Mock Trial.” International Studies Perspectives 7(2): 159-171. Asal, V. (2005) “Playing Games with International Relations.” International Studies Perspectives 6(3): 359-373. Austin, C.W., T. McDowell and D. Sacko (2006) “Synergy Acorss the Curriculum: Simulating the Institution of Postwar Iraqi Government.” Journal of Political Science Education 2: 89-112. Boyer, M., P. Trumbore, and D. Fricke (2006). “Teaching Theories of International Political Economy from the Pit: A Simple In-Class Simulation.” International Studies Perspectives 7(1): 67-76. Brown, S and F. King (2000) “Constructivist Pedagogy and How We Learn: Edudational Psychology Meets International Studies.” International Studies Perspectives 1: 245-264.

Authors: Stover, William.
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group provides a somewhat greater level of confidence in the quantitative findings, and
the qualitative responses support the statistical data. Replication of this study and others
would help lend greater reliability to findings about the effect of simulations on teaching
and learning.
Such replication is made easier by a website sponsored by Santa Clara University where
on line simulations can be created and studied. The Conflict Resolution Simulation site
http://www.scu.edu/crs presents several simulations and templates for creating new ones
that can be shared by instructors of international studies and political science. The Cuban
Missile Crisis Simulation, the subject of this paper, is found on this site. Additionally,
the site presents a contemporary Middle East simulation that involves universities, faculty
and students in Egypt, Lebanon, Israel, Morocco, and the United States. Instructors can
join this simulation during the scheduled times or create their own version using the
template on the site. A third deals with international legal adjudication that has been
useful in the teaching of international law. Finally, the site contains a method for
facilitating a dialog among Christians, Jews, and Muslims (Stover, 2005B; 2006).
Using simulations like these that involve many countries as well as different types of
students and universities over extended time periods, researchers can contribute to
Krain’s challenge by developing new methods for teaching and learning and conducting
studies that measure their effectiveness.
References for The Cuban Missile Crisis
Allison, G. and P. Zelikow (1999) Essence of Decision. New York: Addison Wesley.
Ambrosio, T. (2004) “Bringing Ethnic Conflict into the Classroom: A Student-Centered
Simulation of Multiethnic Politics.” Political Science and Politics 37(2): 285-289.
________ (2006) “Trying Saddam Hussein: Teaching International Law Through an
Undergraduate Mock Trial.” International Studies Perspectives 7(2): 159-171.
Asal, V. (2005) “Playing Games with International Relations.” International Studies
Perspectives
6(3): 359-373.
Austin, C.W., T. McDowell and D. Sacko (2006) “Synergy Acorss the Curriculum:
Simulating the Institution of Postwar Iraqi Government.” Journal of Political Science
Education
2: 89-112.
Boyer, M., P. Trumbore, and D. Fricke (2006). “Teaching Theories of International
Political Economy from the Pit: A Simple In-Class Simulation.” International Studies
Perspectives
7(1): 67-76.
Brown, S and F. King (2000) “Constructivist Pedagogy and How We Learn: Edudational
Psychology Meets International Studies.” International Studies Perspectives 1: 245-264.


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