All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Information Technology and International Relations: Using On Line, Interactive Simulations to Transcend Time, Space, and Attitudes
Unformatted Document Text:  classes. With the help of their instructors, students can evaluate these views and draw conclusions about the claims of their spokespersons. This paper examines the learning experience of American students at a Jesuit, Catholic university exposed to moral positions from Islam and Judaism, religious traditions different from their own. Scholars, teachers and practitioners apply faith based reasoning to understand and explain issues in Middle East conflict: terrorism, resistance to occupation, the United States role in the Middle East, and the prospects for peace. The participants share their religious, ethical positions with student in an on line learning experience. The study evaluates the effects of these moral reflections on students’ attitudes toward political entities involved in Middle East conflict, “predominantly Jewish Israel” and “predominantly Muslim Arab countries.” After surveying an extensive literature on student attitude change, the author presents the study’s methodology as well as its quantitative and qualitative findings. Literature Survey Attitude change seems to be part of students’ learning experience, and how it happens has become the subject of considerable study. Researchers have used a variety of educational circumstances and experiences to explain students’ attitudes, and their findings seem to fit one of several categories. The first involves course content including gender or religious studies classes and the students’ academic majors. Jones (1988) reports that participants in an introductory gender studies course scored significantly lower in measures of sexism at the end of the course than at the beginning. Male students were higher than females in the sexism measure at the start, but both declined by equivalent amounts. Stake (2001) indicates that women’s studies students showed greater activism in socio-political causes and an intension to become more politically active. In a study of attitude change in a large number of women’s and gender studies classes, Sevlius (2003) found that students who have prior attitudes discordant with the class-relevant views are more resistant to change. Bryant (2003) found that students’ traditionalist values decline during college, the result of women’s studies courses as well as the relevance of peers, academic engagement, and experiences of diversity. Fowler (1995) examined the effect of religious studies courses on female student attitudes toward religion. She reports that students taking the courses showed a significant increase in their willingness to question their religious convictions while maintaining their basic faith. Keljo (1996) reports changed attitudes in students taking a freshman class on moral values. In a three year comparison of social science and business students, Guimond (1985) found the social science majors maintained more liberal attitudes and attributed poverty and unemployment to systemic causes. Business majors became more favorable to “capitalists”, less favorable to “unions”, and attributed poverty and unemployment to personal factors.

Authors: Stover, William.
first   previous   Page 19 of 53   next   last



background image
classes. With the help of their instructors, students can evaluate these views and draw
conclusions about the claims of their spokespersons.
This paper examines the learning experience of American students at a Jesuit, Catholic
university exposed to moral positions from Islam and Judaism, religious traditions
different from their own. Scholars, teachers and practitioners apply faith based reasoning
to understand and explain issues in Middle East conflict: terrorism, resistance to
occupation, the United States role in the Middle East, and the prospects for peace. The
participants share their religious, ethical positions with student in an on line learning
experience. The study evaluates the effects of these moral reflections on students’
attitudes toward political entities involved in Middle East conflict, “predominantly
Jewish Israel” and “predominantly Muslim Arab countries.” After surveying an extensive
literature on student attitude change, the author presents the study’s methodology as well
as its quantitative and qualitative findings.
Literature Survey

Attitude change seems to be part of students’ learning experience, and how it happens has
become the subject of considerable study. Researchers have used a variety of educational
circumstances and experiences to explain students’ attitudes, and their findings seem to
fit one of several categories. The first involves course content including gender or
religious studies classes and the students’ academic majors.
Jones (1988) reports that participants in an introductory gender studies course scored
significantly lower in measures of sexism at the end of the course than at the beginning.
Male students were higher than females in the sexism measure at the start, but both
declined by equivalent amounts. Stake (2001) indicates that women’s studies students
showed greater activism in socio-political causes and an intension to become more
politically active. In a study of attitude change in a large number of women’s and gender
studies classes, Sevlius (2003) found that students who have prior attitudes discordant
with the class-relevant views are more resistant to change. Bryant (2003) found that
students’ traditionalist values decline during college, the result of women’s studies
courses as well as the relevance of peers, academic engagement, and experiences of
diversity.
Fowler (1995) examined the effect of religious studies courses on female student attitudes
toward religion. She reports that students taking the courses showed a significant
increase in their willingness to question their religious convictions while maintaining
their basic faith. Keljo (1996) reports changed attitudes in students taking a freshman
class on moral values.
In a three year comparison of social science and business students, Guimond (1985)
found the social science majors maintained more liberal attitudes and attributed poverty
and unemployment to systemic causes. Business majors became more favorable to
“capitalists”, less favorable to “unions”, and attributed poverty and unemployment to
personal factors.


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 19 of 53   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.