All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Information Technology and International Relations: Using On Line, Interactive Simulations to Transcend Time, Space, and Attitudes
Unformatted Document Text:  promote different things, and hopefully in the future it will be used to promote peace.” “I often linked Muslim countries to…suicide bombers and other terrorist activity due to the media’s focus…I wasn’t’ aware that suicide bombers were considered immoral by Muslims, but (now I understand) that they are acting out of personal choice.” Reporting about their changed views toward Israel, subjects in this group wrote: “I know people are fighting for causes they really believe in, and I try to understand Israel’s views. By seeing this web site I know I’m not alone.” “The web site helped me understand (my stereotype of) Israel’s entrenched mind set as more defensive in nature.” “I saw Israel as a country American agreed with so their political actions seem justified. Use of the web site made me see a deeper reason for their acts.” A number of students in this group reported no change in their attitudes. Typical are the comments of one student who writes, “I am an Israeli supporter because I believe they are being treated unfairly. The comments on the web site just confirmed my views.” Another states: “It’s impossible to say who is right or wrong. Sacrifice is required by both sides, but both are locked in a stalemate.” Finally, one student concludes, “My stereotypes haven’t changed…but my understanding of different points of view have improved. I don’t think either side should be using violence against civilians… Strong faith can be an excuse for violence, (but that) will end in all out war. We can only hope that leaders who seek peace and are willing to (negotiate) will come to power in the future.” In the qualitative questionnaire, subjects were asked: “To what do you attribute the change (in your personal stereotypes), if any?” It is interesting to note that most students--twenty two of the twenty four reporting changed attitudes--replied in terms attributing their change to “the internet,” “use of the web site,” “internet use,” or “web site use.” Students also explained their change by using the content of the moral arguments, but seemed drawn to the medium as well as the message in their own description on the reasons for their changed attitudes. The study’s methodology is unable to determine the degree to which change resulted from the moral content of the message or the means of communication. To do so, the research design would have to divide each of the groups in half, presenting some subjects with printed material, and others with the web site. This would make the analysis of such a small number of subjects in each group less meaningful. During the in-class debriefing of the study, students were asked why they included the internet as an explanation for their changed attitudes. Their responses provide anecdotal evidence for its importance in generating enthusiasm for learning. One student said that it was exciting to be able to get the material as it was “posted by participants so far away.” Another explained that the experience “made us feel important, as if the whole event was meant for us.” Others said the on-line experience provided “testimonies” that presented “other sides of the story,” giving a “clearer picture of motivation” and inducing “sympathy and empathy.” Two students reported using links on the web site to investigate further sources of information, and one said the web site helped her respect

Authors: Stover, William.
first   previous   Page 29 of 53   next   last



background image
promote different things, and hopefully in the future it will be used to promote peace.” “I
often linked Muslim countries to…suicide bombers and other terrorist activity due to the
media’s focus…I wasn’t’ aware that suicide bombers were considered immoral by
Muslims, but (now I understand) that they are acting out of personal choice.”
Reporting about their changed views toward Israel, subjects in this group wrote: “I know
people are fighting for causes they really believe in, and I try to understand Israel’s
views. By seeing this web site I know I’m not alone.” “The web site helped me
understand (my stereotype of) Israel’s entrenched mind set as more defensive in nature.”
“I saw Israel as a country American agreed with so their political actions seem justified.
Use of the web site made me see a deeper reason for their acts.”
A number of students in this group reported no change in their attitudes. Typical are the
comments of one student who writes, “I am an Israeli supporter because I believe they are
being treated unfairly. The comments on the web site just confirmed my views.”
Another states: “It’s impossible to say who is right or wrong. Sacrifice is required by
both sides, but both are locked in a stalemate.” Finally, one student concludes, “My
stereotypes haven’t changed…but my understanding of different points of view have
improved. I don’t think either side should be using violence against civilians… Strong
faith can be an excuse for violence, (but that) will end in all out war. We can only hope
that leaders who seek peace and are willing to (negotiate) will come to power in the
future.”
In the qualitative questionnaire, subjects were asked: “To what do you attribute the
change (in your personal stereotypes), if any?” It is interesting to note that most
students--twenty two of the twenty four reporting changed attitudes--replied in terms
attributing their change to “the internet,” “use of the web site,” “internet use,” or “web
site use.” Students also explained their change by using the content of the moral
arguments, but seemed drawn to the medium as well as the message in their own
description on the reasons for their changed attitudes. The study’s methodology is unable
to determine the degree to which change resulted from the moral content of the message
or the means of communication. To do so, the research design would have to divide each
of the groups in half, presenting some subjects with printed material, and others with the
web site. This would make the analysis of such a small number of subjects in each group
less meaningful.
During the in-class debriefing of the study, students were asked why they included the
internet as an explanation for their changed attitudes. Their responses provide anecdotal
evidence for its importance in generating enthusiasm for learning. One student said that
it was exciting to be able to get the material as it was “posted by participants so far
away.” Another explained that the experience “made us feel important, as if the whole
event was meant for us.” Others said the on-line experience provided “testimonies” that
presented “other sides of the story,” giving a “clearer picture of motivation” and inducing
“sympathy and empathy.” Two students reported using links on the web site to
investigate further sources of information, and one said the web site helped her respect


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 29 of 53   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.