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Beyond Model UN: Simulating Multilevel, Multiactor Diplomacy with the Millennium Development Goals
Unformatted Document Text:  Crossley-Frolick assignments, it is more likely that they were simply better prepared and more confident, regardless of role, and that their superior performance had a dampening effect on the others. Controlling for these factors is admittedly difficult, but not impossible perhaps with a more careful analysis of student skills. The night class, by contrast, drew older, more advanced students, who were mostly political science majors. But there were also several students majoring in international studies, business, biology and sociology. This could account for the by and large better result in terms of student engagement, quality of preparation, and role playing. In general, student contributions on Blackboard prior to the simulation and during the week between class sessions were more vibrant, with delegates sharing information and actively challenging/probing each other’s positions. The quality of speeches, caucusing and formal discussions far outpaced that of the students from the day class. The Plan of Action was actively debated, rendering an outcome that was more mixed, but ultimately more reflective of the realities involved in international negotiations. Students had to make trade-offs and agree to provisions that were suboptimal, but could garner the most support from others. Finally, all of the students in the night class dressed in business attire for the conference, lending verisimilitude to the overall experience. In “dressing up” for their assigned roles they acted more professionally, confidently and competently. Conclusion The simulation seems meet many of the objectives that I set at the outset: The students found it fun and enjoyable, if labor intensive. Indeed, in course 17

Authors: Crossley-Frolick, Katy.
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Crossley-Frolick
assignments, it is more likely that they were simply better prepared and more
confident, regardless of role, and that their superior performance had a
dampening effect on the others. Controlling for these factors is admittedly
difficult, but not impossible perhaps with a more careful analysis of student skills.
The night class, by contrast, drew older, more advanced students, who
were mostly political science majors. But there were also several students
majoring in international studies, business, biology and sociology. This could
account for the by and large better result in terms of student engagement, quality
of preparation, and role playing. In general, student contributions on Blackboard
prior to the simulation and during the week between class sessions were more
vibrant, with delegates sharing information and actively challenging/probing each
other’s positions. The quality of speeches, caucusing and formal discussions far
outpaced that of the students from the day class. The Plan of Action was actively
debated, rendering an outcome that was more mixed, but ultimately more
reflective of the realities involved in international negotiations. Students had to
make trade-offs and agree to provisions that were suboptimal, but could garner
the most support from others. Finally, all of the students in the night class
dressed in business attire for the conference, lending verisimilitude to the overall
experience. In “dressing up” for their assigned roles they acted more
professionally, confidently and competently.
Conclusion
The simulation seems meet many of the objectives that I set at the outset:
The students found it fun and enjoyable, if labor intensive. Indeed, in course
17


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