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Effects of a Simulation on Exam Scores and Teaching Evaluation Results
Unformatted Document Text:  Structure of the Simulation The simulation was designed by members of the university’s Model United Nations (MUN) club and the Princeton International Crisis Simulation, which several members of the university’s MUN had participated in, was used as a guide. The students who participated in each semester’s simulation were divided into teams that represented the governments of Middle Eastern nation- states, such as Iran and Saudi Arabia, or international organizations and regional non-state actors, such as the Democratic Kurdish Alliance and Hizbollah. Each team was led by a chairperson from the MUN, who functioned as the line of communication between his or her team and the simulation’s command center operated by MUN members. The other students on each team were randomly assigned the roles of specific team-level state officials – e.g., Minister of Defense – or leaders of non-state actors. For each semester’s simulation, MUN members created a series of crisis scenarios to which each team would have to decide how to respond. Neither team chairpersons nor the other team members knew of these scenarios prior to the simulation. Crises included events such as mortar fire from the Golan Heights into Israel, an oil spill in the Persian Gulf caused by a disabled oil tanker, and terrorist attacks against Saudi oil facilities. Each simulation occurred over two successive days for total period of eight hours. Teams were located in separate rooms equipped with a computer console, internet access, and a large wall-screen. Communication from or to each team was primarily electronic and had to pass through the crisis command center so that its staff would be aware of all the teams’ decisions and be able to coordinate events. These communications were in the form of action orders, of which there were six types. One type, an operation action order, notified the command center that a team wanted to launch a military operation, while other types functioned as messages from one

Authors: Raymond, Chad.
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Structure of the Simulation
The simulation was designed by members of the university’s Model United Nations (MUN) club
and the Princeton International Crisis Simulation, which several members of the university’s
MUN had participated in, was used as a guide. The students who participated in each semester’s
simulation were divided into teams that represented the governments of Middle Eastern nation-
states, such as Iran and Saudi Arabia, or international organizations and regional non-state actors,
such as the Democratic Kurdish Alliance and Hizbollah. Each team was led by a chairperson
from the MUN, who functioned as the line of communication between his or her team and the
simulation’s command center operated by MUN members. The other students on each team
were randomly assigned the roles of specific team-level state officials – e.g., Minister of Defense
– or leaders of non-state actors.
For each semester’s simulation, MUN members created a series of crisis scenarios to
which each team would have to decide how to respond. Neither team chairpersons nor the other
team members knew of these scenarios prior to the simulation. Crises included events such as
mortar fire from the Golan Heights into Israel, an oil spill in the Persian Gulf caused by a
disabled oil tanker, and terrorist attacks against Saudi oil facilities.
Each simulation occurred over two successive days for total period of eight hours.
Teams were located in separate rooms equipped with a computer console, internet access, and a
large wall-screen. Communication from or to each team was primarily electronic and had to pass
through the crisis command center so that its staff would be aware of all the teams’ decisions and
be able to coordinate events. These communications were in the form of action orders, of which
there were six types. One type, an operation action order, notified the command center that a
team wanted to launch a military operation, while other types functioned as messages from one


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