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Using a Role-Playing Simulation to Bridge Theory and Practice in Graduate Professional Education
Unformatted Document Text:  Using a Role-Playing Simulation to Bridge Theory and Practice in Graduate Professional Education “Throughout the first two days of the simulation, it appeared as though Russia and the Latin American states were left in the periphery of negotiations. Therefore, my role as the Russian Ambassador to Brazil provided little to occupy my time.” (RU) “This made for a discouraging capstone experience, NOT because I did not understand my role, but because I wasn’t as involved as some of the other groups. Had I been given a hint as to how I should respond…perhaps I would not have felt as marginalized.” (NATO) “…while some actors were directly implicated in the simulation, others were not.” (RU) “There were many points during the simulation where I felt left out and with very little to do. I understand that this was part of the simulation design and was meant to teach a lesson in patience.” (RU) “Overall, I found the simulation to be an interesting and enlightening, if not incredibly frustrating experience. It needs to be fixed up a bit, with a fairer division of labor.” (ME) “While I thoroughly enjoyed my role in the simulation, I could tell that some other participants felt they had an insignificant and unimportant role.” (ASIA)“…some individuals who had nothing much to contribute were, in my view, marginalized.” (ME) “Despite the good intentions of the simulation, many countries were marginalized” (ME) “Cons: Individual breaking their role due to their lack of interest.” (ASIA) “Some groups felt marginalized and demanded that the Security Council include them in the talks even if they weren’t directly involved. It was difficult not to marginalize these groups while remaining focused on substantive issues….Issues were created if roles were not inherently active” (UN) “It was frustrating to see other countries such as Russia, the US, and Latin American countries, be pretty much left out of every problem we got, and have colleagues wanting desperately to be included while European and Arab countries had a lot to discuss and talk about. Although some people were able to somehow get involved, other ideas from other countries were shut down because they were ‘tangential’” (UN) Lack of Internet Limits Ability to Do Research “…without the Internet, the experience becomes severely impacted. Had we been given some time to prepare for our roles, we may not have had to rely so much on electronic resources for background information. That is part of the problem of being a country you are not as familiar with.” (NATO) “I thought it was hilarious that the Internet didn’t work while at camp. I think it was great to operate within a crisis, lacking perfect information and resources. I know it led to a lot of frustration and stress, but I think that is real life. Not all variables can be controlled, this simulation definitely contributed to a better understanding of that” (EU) “On Monday, the general tendency was to remain behind closed doors.” (USA) “…no Internet connection. Though we had a good Plan B, our research was limited. (RU) 16

Authors: Bonham, G. Matthew.
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Using a Role-Playing Simulation to Bridge Theory and Practice in Graduate Professional Education
“Throughout the first two days of the simulation, it appeared as though Russia and the Latin
American states were left in the periphery of negotiations. Therefore, my role as the Russian
Ambassador to Brazil provided little to occupy my time.” (RU)
“This made for a discouraging capstone experience, NOT because I did not understand my role,
but because I wasn’t as involved as some of the other groups. Had I been given a hint as to how
I should respond…perhaps I would not have felt as marginalized.” (NATO)
“…while some actors were directly implicated in the simulation, others were not.” (RU)
“There were many points during the simulation where I felt left out and with very little to do. I
understand that this was part of the simulation design and was meant to teach a lesson in
patience.” (RU)
“Overall, I found the simulation to be an interesting and enlightening, if not incredibly frustrating
experience. It needs to be fixed up a bit, with a fairer division of labor.” (ME)
“While I thoroughly enjoyed my role in the simulation, I could tell that some other participants felt
they had an insignificant and unimportant role.” (ASIA)
“…some individuals who had nothing much to contribute were, in my view, marginalized.” (ME)
“Despite the good intentions of the simulation, many countries were marginalized” (ME)
“Cons: Individual breaking their role due to their lack of interest.” (ASIA)
“Some groups felt marginalized and demanded that the Security Council include them in the talks
even if they weren’t directly involved. It was difficult not to marginalize these groups while
remaining focused on substantive issues….Issues were created if roles were not inherently
active” (UN)
“It was frustrating to see other countries such as Russia, the US, and Latin American countries,
be pretty much left out of every problem we got, and have colleagues wanting desperately to be
included while European and Arab countries had a lot to discuss and talk about. Although some
people were able to somehow get involved, other ideas from other countries were shut down
because they were ‘tangential’” (UN)
Lack of Internet Limits Ability to Do Research
“…without the Internet, the experience becomes severely impacted. Had we been given some
time to prepare for our roles, we may not have had to rely so much on electronic resources for
background information. That is part of the problem of being a country you are not as familiar
with.” (NATO)
“I thought it was hilarious that the Internet didn’t work while at camp. I think it was great to
operate within a crisis, lacking perfect information and resources. I know it led to a lot of
frustration and stress, but I think that is real life. Not all variables can be controlled, this
simulation definitely contributed to a better understanding of that” (EU)
“On Monday, the general tendency was to remain behind closed doors.” (USA)
“…no Internet connection. Though we had a good Plan B, our research was limited. (RU)
16


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