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Using a Role-Playing Simulation to Bridge Theory and Practice in Graduate Professional Education
Unformatted Document Text:  Using a Role-Playing Simulation to Bridge Theory and Practice in Graduate Professional Education “I liked the way the simulation was organized, although the lack of an Internet connection was an issue…” (ME) “I had mixed feelings about the role of the Internet; losing it in the middle of the simulation show both its pros and cons. I wish I had been able to do additional research as the simulation progressed, but I also saw the downsides of being dependent on technology.” (ME) “I will grant that the lack of technological capabilities was a positive and a negative….Monday was the opposite from Tuesday with no Internet connection, which made it difficult and slowed down communication almost too much.” (NATO) “I found it challenging to follow closely what was happening with and between the different actors at all times. The Internet helped with this. Things were complicated somewhat at the retreat center when we had no Internet access—but I still feel we were able to get things done fairly well with out it. It was an interesting test for students who are highly reliant on technology to go without it.” (Asia) “The inconvenience of the Internet and cell phone access in most cases hijacked our progress to a certain degree.” (ME) “I preferred the system without the Internet and could focus on the smaller number of issues and think this should be the case for next year.” (UN) “On the first day having instant messaging made it easy to work because we had instant communication with each other that was non-intrusive. On days two and three having to run back and forth every time we needed to make a decision as China, made the process much more difficult. Communications between country team members is obviously VERY important for crafting a unified strategy in a constantly changing environment.” (ASIA) “The second day in Casowasco was radically different. Without the Internet, communications were extremely hard. Press releases took forever and we never knew if they were actually from the press, from HQ, or some other group.” (UN) “The technology issue was definitely mostly to blame…” “…it [the retreat center] is not habilitated for an activity that had been designed around the premise and requirement that we all had laptops with wireless capability and where all the communications took place through e-mail.” (UN) “At the Casowasco retreat, however, technology was prevented from playing its role due to infra-structure issues. This not only slowed down communication processes which reduced team efficiency as it also prevented participants from gathering official information about institution’s procedural matters in the WWW.” (EU) No Time Was Provided for Research on Topic and Roles “Written information at the beginning of simulation was limited. More information on issues under discussion and states’ positions concerning these particular issues would have been helpful.” (RU) “My European Commission group started off strong trying to combat the situation, but we lacked a lot of background information that frustrated our process. Our information packet included some information about what we needed to accomplish, but didn’t provide us with Standard Operating Procedures, which would have been helpful. It was unclear how much we could just 17

Authors: Bonham, G. Matthew.
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Using a Role-Playing Simulation to Bridge Theory and Practice in Graduate Professional Education
“I liked the way the simulation was organized, although the lack of an Internet connection was an
issue…” (ME)
“I had mixed feelings about the role of the Internet; losing it in the middle of the simulation show
both its pros and cons. I wish I had been able to do additional research as the simulation
progressed, but I also saw the downsides of being dependent on technology.” (ME)
“I will grant that the lack of technological capabilities was a positive and a negative….Monday
was the opposite from Tuesday with no Internet connection, which made it difficult and slowed
down communication almost too much.” (NATO)
“I found it challenging to follow closely what was happening with and between the different actors
at all times. The Internet helped with this. Things were complicated somewhat at the retreat
center when we had no Internet access—but I still feel we were able to get things done fairly well
with out it. It was an interesting test for students who are highly reliant on technology to go
without it.” (Asia)
“The inconvenience of the Internet and cell phone access in most cases hijacked our progress to
a certain degree.” (ME)
“I preferred the system without the Internet and could focus on the smaller number of issues and
think this should be the case for next year.” (UN)
“On the first day having instant messaging made it easy to work because we had instant
communication with each other that was non-intrusive. On days two and three having to run back
and forth every time we needed to make a decision as China, made the process much more
difficult. Communications between country team members is obviously VERY important for
crafting a unified strategy in a constantly changing environment.” (ASIA)
“The second day in Casowasco was radically different. Without the Internet, communications
were extremely hard. Press releases took forever and we never knew if they were actually from
the press, from HQ, or some other group.” (UN)
“The technology issue was definitely mostly to blame…”
“…it [the retreat center] is not habilitated for an activity that had been designed around the
premise and requirement that we all had laptops with wireless capability and where all the
communications took place through e-mail.” (UN)
“At the Casowasco retreat, however, technology was prevented from playing its role due to infra-
structure issues. This not only slowed down communication processes which reduced team
efficiency as it also prevented participants from gathering official information about institution’s
procedural matters in the WWW.” (EU)
No Time Was Provided for Research on Topic and Roles
“Written information at the beginning of simulation was limited. More information on issues under
discussion and states’ positions concerning these particular issues would have been
helpful.” (RU)
“My European Commission group started off strong trying to combat the situation, but we lacked
a lot of background information that frustrated our process. Our information packet included
some information about what we needed to accomplish, but didn’t provide us with Standard
Operating Procedures, which would have been helpful. It was unclear how much we could just
17


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