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Using a Role-Playing Simulation to Bridge Theory and Practice in Graduate Professional Education
Unformatted Document Text:  Using a Role-Playing Simulation to Bridge Theory and Practice in Graduate Professional Education fabricate, due to our information deficit, or how much we had to rely on HQ or the Internet to get accurate information.” (EU) “…we should have been given time to do some research about our country…in order to increase our negotiation power.” (LA) “…we needed some time to research about our country or organization.” (LA) “”…I wish that we had been informed of our roles prior to the simulation….I would have been much more effective if I had known more about American relations with other countries, NATO, and the EU.” (USA) “…it would have added to the effective management of the simulation, if there was a prior information session or lecture to provide basic background information.” (USA) “…had I received my appointment prior to the simulation, I would have better understood my economic and political arrangements between Russia and Brazil.” (RU) “…no prior information on the specifics of the simulation.” (RU) “Another glaring problem was a lack of understanding in regards to the procedural working of some groups, specifically in regards to the EU. Much of the first day ended up being wasted because the EU Commission, Council, and Parliament did not understand their powers and the order in which the EU body was to legislate.” (NATO) “…the students could have more time with research so that the negotiations will meet real-life criteria. Some of the students had to represent countries that they were not very familiar with….” (NATO) “On Monday I gathered a substantial amount of information from the Internet; however, information on the UN, EU, and NATO’s decision-making procedures and other security policies was not shared or instructed during the simulation. Receiving more adequate information and instruction would have led our experience to be more successful and valuable.” (NATO) “Some students didn’t seem to have much information on the country they were representing. So I feel that students should be given prior information on the country they are representing.” (ASIA) “Recommendations: Provide role information a week to 48 hours ahead of time. Also this way the actor can prepare and get into the mind set of the role. This will resolve some technical issues.” (ASIA) “I would have liked to have had more time to prepare for my role—maybe a weekend to do research on China’s mission to the UN might have made me a more effective participant.” (ASIA) The Simulation Needed More Structure and a Greater Faculty Role “I do not feel I learned very much from the experience. I do not think the simulation had enough structure. Individuals and teams should have had more information on what they were supposed to do. (LA) “Most of our instructions on the individual level and on the group level, as well, were vague and broadly defined and rather general.” (ME) 18

Authors: Bonham, G. Matthew.
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Using a Role-Playing Simulation to Bridge Theory and Practice in Graduate Professional Education
fabricate, due to our information deficit, or how much we had to rely on HQ or the Internet to get
accurate information.” (EU)
“…we should have been given time to do some research about our country…in order to increase
our negotiation power.” (LA)
“…we needed some time to research about our country or organization.” (LA)
“”…I wish that we had been informed of our roles prior to the simulation….I would have been
much more effective if I had known more about American relations with other countries, NATO,
and the EU.” (USA)
“…it would have added to the effective management of the simulation, if there was a prior
information session or lecture to provide basic background information.” (USA)
“…had I received my appointment prior to the simulation, I would have better understood my
economic and political arrangements between Russia and Brazil.” (RU)
“…no prior information on the specifics of the simulation.” (RU)
“Another glaring problem was a lack of understanding in regards to the procedural working of
some groups, specifically in regards to the EU. Much of the first day ended up being wasted
because the EU Commission, Council, and Parliament did not understand their powers and the
order in which the EU body was to legislate.” (NATO)
“…the students could have more time with research so that the negotiations will meet real-life
criteria. Some of the students had to represent countries that they were not very familiar
with….” (NATO)
“On Monday I gathered a substantial amount of information from the Internet; however,
information on the UN, EU, and NATO’s decision-making procedures and other security policies
was not shared or instructed during the simulation. Receiving more adequate information and
instruction would have led our experience to be more successful and valuable.” (NATO)
“Some students didn’t seem to have much information on the country they were representing. So
I feel that students should be given prior information on the country they are
representing.” (ASIA)
“Recommendations: Provide role information a week to 48 hours ahead of time. Also this way the
actor can prepare and get into the mind set of the role. This will resolve some technical
issues.” (ASIA)
“I would have liked to have had more time to prepare for my role—maybe a weekend to do
research on China’s mission to the UN might have made me a more effective participant.” (ASIA)
The Simulation Needed More Structure and a Greater Faculty Role
“I do not feel I learned very much from the experience. I do not think the simulation had enough
structure. Individuals and teams should have had more information on what they were supposed
to do. (LA)
“Most of our instructions on the individual level and on the group level, as well, were vague and
broadly defined and rather general.” (ME)
18


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