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Unformatted Document Text:  Van Vechten, 39 The How s of Lobbying Lobbying Project, Part 2 (American Politics: Van Vechten, Spring 2007) Now that you ve joined the ranks of that special group of influencers we call lobbyists, you ve got a job to do. The Congress class (GOV 304) has introduced a set of bills into Congress, which they will be considering in committee on Weds., March 14 th and Weds., March 21 st. Later, they will be debating those bills on the House Floor (Weds 4/4, and Weds 4/11). So that they might consider the viewpoints of influential people and groups (such as those that YOU represent as a lobbyist), you will need to communicate your organization s position about one bill to at least one member of the Congress class. In effect, you will LOBBY for or against a bill of your choosing. Whom do I lobby? You may lobby anyone in the Congress class to make your position known. If you meet the Congress member face-to-face, you may even lobby in groups (i.e. you join forces with someone else who takes the same position on a bil; you both meet with the Congress member). You may lobby as many Congress members as you want, but will only receive up to five points for the first contact, and 1 point for additional in-person contacts (up to two additional; see chart below). How do I contact the Congress member?A list of Congress members has been uploaded to the Blackboard website. You will get all the points for this exercise (5 points) if you meet in person. If that doesn t occur, you may contact a person by phone or email to communicate your position for fewer points (2 points each). You can get credit for UP TO a TOTAL of 7 points: 5 for the exercise, 2 extra credit. When can we meet?The window of opportunity is open, starting Monday March 5 th , and ending Wednesday, March 21 st at 6pm. What do I say?You want to state which group you represent ( I represent the Allied Farmers of America ) and your position on a bill ( & and we oppose (or support) HR 6331 ), followed by the REASONS you oppose or support the bill ( because it will affect our members in the following ways). It may turn out to be the case that the member isn t very familiar with the bill you re referencing. Be prepared to talk about the bill itself (to educate the member if need be). Be prepared to answer questions the Congress member might have for you, such as Why? What could we change in this bill to make your members happy? or Under what circumstances would you support the bill? How do I get points? (See chart for points)  When you meet in person, have the Congress member sign a slip of paper (signature) attesting to the fact that you lobbied.  If you send an email, print it out and give it to the prof. The prof needs proof. If you lobby via a phone conversation, then the Congress member will need to email

Authors: Van Vechten, Renee.
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Van Vechten, 39
The How s of Lobbying
Lobbying Project, Part 2
(American Politics: Van Vechten, Spring 2007)
Now that you ve joined the ranks of that special group of influencers we call lobbyists, you ve
got a job to do.
The Congress class (GOV 304) has introduced a set of bills into Congress, which they will be
considering in committee on Weds., March 14
th
and Weds., March 21
st.
Later, they will be
debating those bills on the House Floor (Weds 4/4, and Weds 4/11). So that they might consider
the viewpoints of influential people and groups (such as those that YOU represent as a lobbyist),
you will need to communicate your organization s position about one bill to at least one member
of the Congress class. In effect, you will LOBBY for or against a bill of your choosing.
Whom do I lobby?
You may lobby anyone in the Congress class to make your position known. If you meet the
Congress member face-to-face, you may even lobby in groups (i.e. you join forces with someone
else who takes the same position on a bil; you both meet with the Congress member). You may
lobby as many Congress members as you want, but will only receive up to five points for the
first contact, and 1 point for additional in-person contacts (up to two additional; see chart below).
How do I contact the Congress member?
A list of Congress members has been uploaded to the Blackboard website. You will get all the
points for this exercise (5 points) if you meet in person. If that doesn t occur, you may contact a
person by phone or email to communicate your position for fewer points (2 points each). You
can get credit for UP TO a TOTAL of 7 points: 5 for the exercise, 2 extra credit.
When can we meet?
The window of opportunity is open, starting Monday March 5
th
, and ending Wednesday, March
21
st
at 6pm.
What do I say?
You want to state which group you represent ( I represent the Allied Farmers of America )
and your position on a bill ( & and we oppose (or support) HR 6331 ), followed by the
REASONS you oppose or support the bill ( because it will affect our members in the
following ways). It may turn out to be the case that the member isn t very familiar with the bill
you re referencing. Be prepared to talk about the bill itself (to educate the member if need be).
Be prepared to answer questions the Congress member might have for you, such as Why?
What could we change in this bill to make your members happy? or Under what
circumstances would you support the bill?
How do I get points? (See chart for points)
 When you meet in person, have the Congress member sign a slip of paper (signature)
attesting to the fact that you lobbied.
 If you send an email, print it out and give it to the prof. The prof needs proof.
 If you lobby via a phone conversation, then the Congress member will need to email


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