All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

The Game of Politics Simulation: An Exploratory Study
Unformatted Document Text:  reality, but not all of reality” (Dorn, 1989, 4). While interest in simulation games peaked in the first half of the 1970's, their use in classroom teaching has not vanished (Dorn, 1989). Perhaps this is due to two distinct reasons. First, classroom pedagogy in recent years has shifted away from sole use of the traditional model of information processing, which focuses on textbook reading followed by in-class lectures and discussions, to the incorporation of more experiential models of learning. As Dorn (1989), borrowing from Coleman (1973, 1978) noted, these two distinct types of models approach learning from opposite directions. Teaching and learning based on the model of information processing follow ...a particular sequence. In the first stage, students receive information from a symbolicmedium such as a book or lecture; in the second stage, they assimilate and understand theinformation; during the third stage, they infer particular applications of what is learned togeneral principles; in the fourth and final stage, they learn to use the general principles toact in some way. Teaching and learning based on the experiential model reverses thissequence, however. In Stage One, students act in a particular instance of application; inStage Two, they attempt to understand the effects of their behavior and decisions in aparticular instance of application; during Stage Three, they seek to understand the generalprinciple under which that instance falls; in the fourth and last stage, they apply the principleto a new circumstance so that learning is useful to their future behavior (6). Simulation games clearly fit the experiential model of learning. The second possible reason for the ongoing use of simulation games in classrooms is the lengthy inventory of positive claims regarding the effectiveness of simulations created by Greenblat (1973), as cited in Walcott and Walcott (1976) and Dorn (1989). This inventory subdivided the claims into five categories. The first category, labeled “motivation and interest” suggested that simulations increase student motivation to learn and their interest in learning. The second category, labeled “cognitive learning” suggested simulation games “deliver effective cognitive and conceptual learning; they are especially good at linking abstract concepts to their explicit referent because players are encouraged to reflect on the meaning of concepts in light of a shared experience “ (Dorn, 1989, 4-5). The third category, labeled “changes in the character of later course work” suggested that simulation games will “promote a more relaxed, friendly and warm climate in which students and teachers will perceive each other more positively” (Dorn, 1989, 5) Teachers are perceived as shifting away from a more authoritarian role to that

Authors: Kahn, Melvin. and Perez, Kathleen.
first   previous   Page 4 of 25   next   last



background image
reality, but not all of reality” (Dorn, 1989, 4).
While interest in simulation games peaked in the first half of the 1970's, their use in classroom
teaching has not vanished (Dorn, 1989). Perhaps this is due to two distinct reasons. First, classroom
pedagogy in recent years has shifted away from sole use of the traditional model of information
processing, which focuses on textbook reading followed by in-class lectures and discussions, to the
incorporation of more experiential models of learning. As Dorn (1989), borrowing from Coleman (1973,
1978) noted, these two distinct types of models approach learning from opposite directions. Teaching and
learning based on the model of information processing follow
...a particular sequence. In the first stage, students receive information from a symbolic
medium such as a book or lecture; in the second stage, they assimilate and understand the
information; during the third stage, they infer particular applications of what is learned to
general principles; in the fourth and final stage, they learn to use the general principles to
act in some way. Teaching and learning based on the experiential model reverses this
sequence, however. In Stage One, students act in a particular instance of application; in
Stage Two, they attempt to understand the effects of their behavior and decisions in a
particular instance of application; during Stage Three, they seek to understand the general
principle under which that instance falls; in the fourth and last stage, they apply the principle
to a new circumstance so that learning is useful to their future behavior (6).
Simulation games clearly fit the experiential model of learning.
The second possible reason for the ongoing use of simulation games in classrooms is the lengthy
inventory of positive claims regarding the effectiveness of simulations created by Greenblat (1973), as
cited in Walcott and Walcott (1976) and Dorn (1989). This inventory subdivided the claims into five
categories. The first category, labeled “motivation and interest” suggested that simulations increase
student motivation to learn and their interest in learning. The second category, labeled “cognitive
learning” suggested simulation games “deliver effective cognitive and conceptual learning; they are
especially good at linking abstract concepts to their explicit referent because players are encouraged to
reflect on the meaning of concepts in light of a shared experience “ (Dorn, 1989, 4-5). The third category,
labeled “changes in the character of later course work” suggested that simulation games will “promote a
more relaxed, friendly and warm climate in which students and teachers will perceive each other more
positively” (Dorn, 1989, 5) Teachers are perceived as shifting away from a more authoritarian role to that


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 25   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.