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The Game of Politics Simulation: An Exploratory Study
Unformatted Document Text:  of a supportive facilitator. Additionally, Dorn (1989) suggested that instructors could expect to see “enhanced cooperation, interaction and communication between students” after having participated in a simulation game. The last two claims regarding the effectiveness of simulation games focus on “affective learning re: subject matter,” and “general affective learning” (Greenblat, 1973). Simulation games, according to Dorn (1989, 4), “provide increased insights into the way the world is seen, especially the moral and intellectual difficulties of others.” One serious caution has consistently been raised regarding this literature on simulation effectiveness. Dating back to Greenblat (1973) and progressing through the work of both Walcott and Walcott (1976) and Dorn (1989) caution has been raised that very little hard evidence exists to document the effectiveness of simulation games. As Walcott and Walcott (1976, 13) state “all of these (claims) represent at least hunches based upon the experience of simulation users. Virtually all of them have anecdotal evidence on their side...” Quantitative data and analysis are needed to support these anecdotal claims. The current study overcomes this caution by adding hard data to the analysis. The Game: Classroom Procedures In this Macro adaptation of The Game 1 students compete for specific legislative, executive, and media role assignments. The simulation game projects four to six years into the future to avoid mere imitation of current issues and political figures. This dynamic simulation uses press conferences, foreign threats, emergencies, plus Story Lines containing distracting events and constituent pressures that often occur at the national level, and may obstruct orderly budgetary and law-making policies. Jansiewicz has created clearly written manuals for both participants and coordinators. 2 Particularly helpful is THE GAME OF POLITICS PARTICIPANT’s MANUAL (The Manual) in which he describes most lucidly the reality of The Game for the American legislative-executive process. Jansiewicz also provides a perceptive three-page review of The Game’s structure and rules which includes explanations on the dominant roles of the majority party in determining the leadership of each chamber and its 1 1 See www.gameofpolitics.com for a discussion of the macro simulation and micro simulation alternatives2See www.gameofpolitics.com for information on how to acquire and use The Game.

Authors: Kahn, Melvin. and Perez, Kathleen.
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of a supportive facilitator. Additionally, Dorn (1989) suggested that instructors could expect to see
“enhanced cooperation, interaction and communication between students” after having participated in a
simulation game. The last two claims regarding the effectiveness of simulation games focus on “affective
learning re: subject matter,” and “general affective learning” (Greenblat, 1973). Simulation games,
according to Dorn (1989, 4), “provide increased insights into the way the world is seen, especially the
moral and intellectual difficulties of others.”
One serious caution has consistently been raised regarding this literature on simulation
effectiveness. Dating back to Greenblat (1973) and progressing through the work of both Walcott and
Walcott (1976) and Dorn (1989) caution has been raised that very little hard evidence exists to document
the effectiveness of simulation games. As Walcott and Walcott (1976, 13) state “all of these (claims)
represent at least hunches based upon the experience of simulation users. Virtually all of them have
anecdotal evidence on their side...” Quantitative data and analysis are needed to support these anecdotal
claims. The current study overcomes this caution by adding hard data to the analysis.
The Game: Classroom Procedures
In this Macro adaptation of The Game
students compete for specific legislative, executive, and
media role assignments. The simulation game projects four to six years into the future to avoid mere
imitation of current issues and political figures. This dynamic simulation uses press conferences, foreign
threats, emergencies, plus Story Lines containing distracting events and constituent pressures that often
occur at the national level, and may obstruct orderly budgetary and law-making policies.
Jansiewicz has created clearly written manuals for both participants and coordinators.
Particularly
helpful is THE GAME OF POLITICS PARTICIPANT’s MANUAL (The Manual) in which he describes
most lucidly the reality of The Game for the American legislative-executive process. Jansiewicz also
provides a perceptive three-page review of The Game’s structure and rules which includes explanations
on the dominant roles of the majority party in determining the leadership of each chamber and its
1
1
See
www.gameofpolitics.com
for a discussion of the macro simulation and micro
simulation alternatives
2See
www.gameofpolitics.com
for information on how to acquire and use The Game.


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