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Teaching American Political Institutions Using Role-playing Simulations
Unformatted Document Text:  37 sort of careful, national, and public oversight I would think ethically important. What I saw was impressive—and for this committee in particular, critical. I saw that these countries understood that basic research in biology would be a core driver of their economy, that the knowledge, wisdom and energy that inspired that research would open the door to a world of new possibilities, some false starts, to be sure, but perhaps-just perhaps—some new starts. These countries understand that turning their full attention to science is not only prudent in our competitive global world, it is compassionate—it is the right thing to do to shape your country’s future toward healing the needs of the suffering. In South Korea’s labs, they meet at dawn to begin the work every single day, working with the same passion and government support we give to our Mars Rover programs, for example. Ought we to tremble when we cross such a threshold of human knowledge? Ought we to worry that we may be going too far or too fast? Of course, for we are being asked to understand the world differently, the self differently, what it means to be human and to be unique, differently—to know and to see things which were impossible to know or see a decade ago. Of course we need to think soberly about the possibility that the research may fail utterly, or that it may succeed but lead us into a place of great unpredictability—that is the very nature of research—that is why the future is what makes us free, this uncertainty. Courage to face the problem will mean a compromise that can be regulated, as we did with recombinant DNA, as we did in organ transplantation. I would urge a far broader and more open policy than our American scientist face now, for it is far too late to stop, ban, or have a moratorium on the basic science of human embryonic stem cells—it not only will proceed, it has proceeded, in Asia, Israel, Europe and England. Stem cell research will now clearly be a possible road. Where that road might turn us is unknown—but what is certain is that if we turn off the road, we will watch others pass us by. Our challenge- and this means each of us—scientist, citizen, congregant, critics and enthusiast—most of all Senator—will be how to live bravely and decently and fairly in a complex world of difficult moral choices. Can stem cell research yield therapies that could help millions who now suffer? Will it yield cures for diabetes, Parkinson’s, spinal cord injury? Who can yet know? If it were able to help even some, that might be light enough in the storm filled world. I tell my son that he must raise these questions, the core questions of ethics and of biology--How are we human? How will we be free? What must I do about the suffering of the other person? And that stem cell science can remind us that we are most human when we act as healers, we are the most free when we explore what we don’t yet know, and we are bound to a duty to shape our work to care always for the person in need.

Authors: Gonzales, Angelo.
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37
sort of careful, national, and public oversight I would think ethically important. What I saw was
impressive—and for this committee in particular, critical. I saw that these countries understood that basic
research in biology would be a core driver of their economy, that the knowledge, wisdom and energy that
inspired that research would open the door to a world of new possibilities, some false starts, to be sure,
but perhaps-just perhaps—some new starts. These countries understand that turning their full attention to
science is not only prudent in our competitive global world, it is compassionate—it is the right thing to do
to shape your country’s future toward healing the needs of the suffering. In South Korea’s labs, they meet
at dawn to begin the work every single day, working with the same passion and government support we
give to our Mars Rover programs, for example.
Ought we to tremble when we cross such a threshold of human knowledge? Ought we to worry that we
may be going too far or too fast? Of course, for we are being asked to understand the world differently,
the self differently, what it means to be human and to be unique, differently—to know and to see things
which were impossible to know or see a decade ago. Of course we need to think soberly about the
possibility that the research may fail utterly, or that it may succeed but lead us into a place of great
unpredictability—that is the very nature of research—that is why the future is what makes us free, this
uncertainty.
Courage to face the problem will mean a compromise that can be regulated, as we did with
recombinant DNA, as we did in organ transplantation. I would urge a far broader and more open
policy than our American scientist face now, for it is far too late to stop, ban, or have a moratorium
on the basic science of human embryonic stem cells—it not only will proceed, it has proceeded
, in
Asia, Israel, Europe and England. Stem cell research will now clearly be a possible road. Where that road
might turn us is unknown—but what is certain is that if we turn off the road, we will watch others pass us
by. Our challenge- and this means each of us—scientist, citizen, congregant, critics and enthusiast—most
of all Senator—will be how to live bravely and decently and fairly in a complex world of difficult moral
choices. Can stem cell research yield therapies that could help millions who now suffer? Will it yield
cures for diabetes, Parkinson’s, spinal cord injury? Who can yet know? If it were able to help even some,
that might be light enough in the storm filled world. I tell my son that he must raise these questions, the
core questions of ethics and of biology--How are we human? How will we be free? What must I do about
the suffering of the other person? And that stem cell science can remind us that we are most human when
we act as healers, we are the most free when we explore what we don’t yet know, and we are bound to a
duty to shape our work to care always for the person in need.



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