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Serving the Greater Good: Delivering General Education Outcomes in a Small Liberal Arts College
Unformatted Document Text:  Appendix B Requirements for 100 Level Courses 1. 100-level classes will not require college level pre-requisites or co-requisites, due to their foundational nature. Exceptions would be pre-requisites for a second course in a 100-level sequence (for example, Chem 121-122). RATIONALE: Most 100-level classes should be suitable for most entering freshmen. Students with lower ACT scores will be placed in appropriate developmental courses (currently numbered less than 100). 2. Each 100-level class must include at least 6 feedback units. NOTE: A feedback unit is a single assignment (which may include multiple problems or parts) for which the student receives timely feedback. Such units are not always graded. RATIONALE: The quality of student understanding and student work is more likely to improve if they receive constructive feedback. 3. Expectations for class participation and class assignments, including due dates, must be clearly communicated in written form (on the syllabus, Blackboard, or other suitable means). RATIONALE: Time management strategies are more successful if a student has a clear idea of the breadth and depth of effort required over the length of the course. Recommendations for 100-level courses 1. Patterns of absences (judged significant by the instructor) in 100-level classes should result in faculty e-mail to the student in question with a copy to the academic advisor and student services. RATIONALE: A high rate of absenteeism almost always predicts failure. Student services staff will contact students and urge them to attend class. 2. Individual meetings out-of-class for each student with the professor are recommended, especially during the first half of the course, when practical. Class time and office hours can be used for such meetings. RATIONALE: Students benefit from one-on-one discussions with faculty. 3. Different learning styles and ways to engage students should be considered when designing class activities. RATIONALE: Students today use many different learning strategies or styles and appreciate variety. 4. At least four grade units (excluding attendance) must contribute to the final grade in a 100-level class, with no one single grade unit counting more than 30% of the final grade. A grade unit is an assignment (or series of assignments), a test, a project, a paper, etc. RATIONALE: Freshmen are more likely to be successful if they have more ‘low stakes’ opportunities to demonstrate their learning, rather than a limited number of ‘high stakes’ opportunities. 5. Feedback on assignments worth 10% of the final grade or 3 graded feedback units must be given to the student by the completion of 20% of class meetings. RATIONALE: Freshmen need early reality checks in order to have a chance to change their study behaviors, if necessary, for success. This requirement would also help spread the graded assignments more evenly across the semester. Lopez & McKinlay, 23

Authors: Lopez, Lillian. and McKinlay, Patrick.
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Appendix B
Requirements for 100 Level Courses
1. 100-level classes will not require college level pre-requisites or co-requisites, due to their foundational nature.
Exceptions would be pre-requisites for a second course in a 100-level sequence (for example, Chem 121-122).
RATIONALE: Most 100-level classes should be suitable for most entering freshmen. Students with lower ACT scores
will be placed in appropriate developmental courses (currently numbered less than 100).
2. Each 100-level class must include at least 6 feedback units.
NOTE: A feedback unit is a single assignment (which may include multiple problems or parts) for which the student
receives timely feedback. Such units are not always graded.
RATIONALE: The quality of student understanding and student work is more likely to improve if they receive
constructive feedback.
3. Expectations for class participation and class assignments, including due dates, must be clearly communicated in written
form (on the syllabus, Blackboard, or other suitable means).
RATIONALE: Time management strategies are more successful if a student has a clear idea of the breadth and depth of
effort required over the length of the course.
Recommendations for 100-level courses
1. Patterns of absences (judged significant by the instructor) in 100-level classes should result in faculty e-mail to the
student in question with a copy to the academic advisor and student services.
RATIONALE: A high rate of absenteeism almost always predicts failure. Student services staff will contact students and
urge them to attend class.
2. Individual meetings out-of-class for each student with the professor are recommended, especially during the first half of
the course, when practical. Class time and office hours can be used for such meetings.
RATIONALE: Students benefit from one-on-one discussions with faculty.
3. Different learning styles and ways to engage students should be considered when designing class activities.
RATIONALE: Students today use many different learning strategies or styles and appreciate variety.
4. At least four grade units (excluding attendance) must contribute to the final grade in a 100-level class, with no one
single grade unit counting more than 30% of the final grade. A grade unit is an assignment (or series of assignments), a
test, a project, a paper, etc.
RATIONALE: Freshmen are more likely to be successful if they have more ‘low stakes’ opportunities to demonstrate their
learning, rather than a limited number of ‘high stakes’ opportunities.
5. Feedback on assignments worth 10% of the final grade or 3 graded feedback units must be given to the student by
the completion of 20% of class meetings.
RATIONALE: Freshmen need early reality checks in order to have a chance to change their study behaviors, if necessary,
for success. This requirement would also help spread the graded assignments more evenly across the semester.
Lopez & McKinlay, 23


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