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Effectiveness of Personal Response Systems as a Classroom Technology Tool at Clemson University
Unformatted Document Text:  Wood has indicated that students who interact with each other and the teacher in the classroom learn concepts well, have a high retention rate and are able to intelligently apply them than students who sit passively listening to the teacher in class. (Wood, 2004) This general principle has been found to be true in all levels of education, from the tertiary level right down to the elementary school. (Wood, 2004) To give students good learning experience and ensure better understanding of concepts for perhaps further study or a good fit in the market, a lot of measures have been offered to solve this problem. There has been the introduction of discussions sessions where large classes are broken into smaller groups for discussion leader led discussions outside the regular classroom (Morris et. al. 2006 unpublished). There has also been arguments to for students to engage in active class learning where visual aids are used as a teaching tool to engage students. The burgeoning information technology has made it possible for the use of simple tools which make it relatively easy to teach large classes where students interact with each other and the teacher to enhance interactive learning in the classroom. When used properly, this technology has the advantage of eliminating discussion sessions where the teacher has to constantly supervise and monitor discussion leaders. One of these technologies, which form the basis of this paper, is personal response systems commonly referred to as iClickers or clickers. Clickers have generally received good reviews in the literature. (Caldwell, 2007; Fies & Marshall, 2006). The use of clickers in classrooms varies considerable from one instructor to the other. In this study, survey methodology and logistic regression is used to assess how well iclickers are used and perceived in classrooms at Clemson University. Based on the survey results, conclusions are also drawn on how students’ perception of clickers as a 4

Authors: Ainuson, Kweku.
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Wood has indicated that students who interact with each other and the teacher in
the classroom learn concepts well, have a high retention rate and are able to intelligently
apply them than students who sit passively listening to the teacher in class. (Wood, 2004)
This general principle has been found to be true in all levels of education, from the
tertiary level right down to the elementary school. (Wood, 2004)
To give students good learning experience and ensure better understanding of
concepts for perhaps further study or a good fit in the market, a lot of measures have been
offered to solve this problem. There has been the introduction of discussions sessions
where large classes are broken into smaller groups for discussion leader led discussions
outside the regular classroom (Morris et. al. 2006 unpublished). There has also been
arguments to for students to engage in active class learning where visual aids are used as
a teaching tool to engage students. The burgeoning information technology has made it
possible for the use of simple tools which make it relatively easy to teach large classes
where students interact with each other and the teacher to enhance interactive learning in
the classroom. When used properly, this technology has the advantage of eliminating
discussion sessions where the teacher has to constantly supervise and monitor discussion
leaders. One of these technologies, which form the basis of this paper, is personal
response systems commonly referred to as iClickers or clickers. Clickers have generally
received good reviews in the literature. (Caldwell, 2007; Fies & Marshall, 2006). The use
of clickers in classrooms varies considerable from one instructor to the other.
In this study, survey methodology and logistic regression is used to assess how
well iclickers are used and perceived in classrooms at Clemson University. Based on the
survey results, conclusions are also drawn on how students’ perception of clickers as a
4


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