All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

The Solution Down the Hall: How Introductory Courses in American Government Can Engage Students
Unformatted Document Text:  The Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI) issued a report on the civic literacy of American college students in 2007, and it too highlights problems beyond the lack of voting. The report argued that America’s colleges fail to increase their students’ knowledge about America’s history and institutions, and that students are “no better off than when they arrived in terms of acquiring the knowledge necessary for informed engagement in a democratic republic.” Not only are students not learning what they need to participate in a democracy, but the report found that graduating seniors know less than their freshman counterparts--a phenomenon the authors of the study term “negative learning.” The nationally representative survey of over 14,000 students highlights a coming crisis in American citizenship and links low levels of political knowledge with lackluster participation in activities related to citizenship. The roots of anemic political participation and feeble civic literacy among American youth are numerous, and assigning blame is probably counterproductive. Yet part of the culpability rests in the nature of many mobilization efforts. In the drive to register and mobilize as many young Americans as possible, and to do so at the lowest possible costs, many youth engagement organizations focus on populations predisposed to becoming engaged - what we might call harvesting the low-hanging fruit. The quickest, most cost-efficient way to produce massive numbers of new registrations, for instance, is to head to the college campus. What better way to tackle the youth disengagement issue than to push more students to the polls? While this is a valuable activity, college students are much more likely to register on their own than other populations of young citizens. And if they do not become involved in their college years, chances are quite high that they will become engaged after graduation, especially compared to other populations.

Authors: Shea, Daniel.
first   previous   Page 3 of 21   next   last



background image
The Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI) issued a report on the civic literacy of American
college students in 2007, and it too highlights problems beyond the lack of voting. The report
argued that America’s colleges fail to increase their students’ knowledge about America’s
history and institutions, and that students are “no better off than when they arrived in terms of
acquiring the knowledge necessary for informed engagement in a democratic republic.” Not
only are students not learning what they need to participate in a democracy, but the report found
that graduating seniors know less than their freshman counterparts--a phenomenon the authors of
the study term “negative learning.” The nationally representative survey of over 14,000 students
highlights a coming crisis in American citizenship and links low levels of political knowledge
with lackluster participation in activities related to citizenship.
The roots of anemic political participation and feeble civic literacy among American
youth are numerous, and assigning blame is probably counterproductive. Yet part of the
culpability rests in the nature of many mobilization efforts. In the drive to register and mobilize
as many young Americans as possible, and to do so at the lowest possible costs, many youth
engagement organizations focus on populations predisposed to becoming engaged - what we
might call harvesting the low-hanging fruit. The quickest, most cost-efficient way to produce
massive numbers of new registrations, for instance, is to head to the college campus. What
better way to tackle the youth disengagement issue than to push more students to the polls?
While this is a valuable activity, college students are much more likely to register on their own
than other populations of young citizens. And if they do not become involved in their college
years, chances are quite high that they will become engaged after graduation, especially
compared to other populations.


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 21   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.