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Civic Engagement: The Iowa Caucuses
Unformatted Document Text:  http://www.drake.edu/artsci/PolSci/PolSci_Home_Page.html#Honesty : “Scholars in the field of politics, like all scholars, are expected to practice intellectual honesty and to uphold the scholarly standards of the discipline. Plagiarism, the deliberate appropriation of the work of others represented as one's own, not only may constitute a violation of the civil law, but also represents a serious breach of professional ethics. Such misconduct (or other forms of cheating) will lead to disciplinary action.Cheating is defined as an act, or attempted act, of giving or obtaining aid and/or information by illicit means in meeting any academic requirements including examinations. Plagiarism is defined as misrepresenting another's ideas, phrases, or discourse as one's own. The penalty for cheating or plagiarism will vary from incident to incident. The possible penalties include a reprimand, grade penalty, dismissal from the course, and a recommendation for dismissal from the University. Responsibility for dealing with cases of academic dishonesty begins with the faculty member who identifies an instance of academic dishonesty. Examples of such cases include cheating on a test by copying from another student or using disallowed materials, incorporating into written assignments materials written by others without giving them credit, and otherwise improperly using information written by others (including that which might be stored on computer disks). Sometimes plagiarism is the result of carelessness or ignorance. As a general rule, provide enough information so that a reader can identify and refer to all the sources you have used in writing a particular work. Here are some guidelines to follow: 1. Word for word quotations: When you incorporate into your work, you must use quotation marks around the borrowed words and you must identify the source.2. Paraphrase: If you have relied on another person's ideas or train of thought but changed the actual words used or the order of the ideas you still must acknowledge the source.3. Borrowed ideas: When your ideas or opinions have been shaped by what you have read or lectures you have heard, you must acknowledge your source.4. Material and Organization: If you rely on factual material gathered by another person, or if you have relied on another person's way of organizing common material, you must acknowledge your source.5. Exceptions to the rule: You need not footnote information that is common knowledge ("George Washington was the first President of the United States") or an opinion or idea expressed by many people ("television has changed the election process") or dictionary definitions.6. Err on the side of over-acknowledgement: Be generous and open in giving credit for any source of help. A student who wishes to appeal a professor's action in a case of cheating or plagiarism begins with a discussion with the professor. If the situation is not resolved to the satisfaction of both parties, the faculty adviser is consulted. The next step, if one is

Authors: Sanders, Arthur.
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“Scholars in the field of politics, like all scholars, are expected to practice intellectual
honesty and to uphold the scholarly standards of the discipline. Plagiarism, the deliberate
appropriation of the work of others represented as one's own, not only may constitute a
violation of the civil law, but also represents a serious breach of professional ethics. Such
misconduct (or other forms of cheating) will lead to disciplinary action.
Cheating is defined as an act, or attempted act, of giving or obtaining aid and/or
information by illicit means in meeting any academic requirements including
examinations. Plagiarism is defined as misrepresenting another's ideas, phrases, or
discourse as one's own.
The penalty for cheating or plagiarism will vary from incident to incident. The possible
penalties include a reprimand, grade penalty, dismissal from the course, and a
recommendation for dismissal from the University.
Responsibility for dealing with cases of academic dishonesty begins with the faculty
member who identifies an instance of academic dishonesty. Examples of such cases
include cheating on a test by copying from another student or using disallowed materials,
incorporating into written assignments materials written by others without giving them
credit, and otherwise improperly using information written by others (including that
which might be stored on computer disks).
Sometimes plagiarism is the result of carelessness or ignorance. As a general rule,
provide enough information so that a reader can identify and refer to all the sources you
have used in writing a particular work. Here are some guidelines to follow:
1. Word for word quotations: When you incorporate into your work, you must use
quotation marks around the borrowed words and you must identify the source.
2. Paraphrase: If you have relied on another person's ideas or train of thought but changed
the actual words used or the order of the ideas you still must acknowledge the source.
3. Borrowed ideas: When your ideas or opinions have been shaped by what you have read
or lectures you have heard, you must acknowledge your source.
4. Material and Organization: If you rely on factual material gathered by another person,
or if you have relied on another person's way of organizing common material, you must
acknowledge your source.
5. Exceptions to the rule: You need not footnote information that is common knowledge
("George Washington was the first President of the United States") or an opinion or idea
expressed by many people ("television has changed the election process") or dictionary
definitions.
6. Err on the side of over-acknowledgement: Be generous and open in giving credit for
any source of help.
A student who wishes to appeal a professor's action in a case of cheating or plagiarism
begins with a discussion with the professor. If the situation is not resolved to the
satisfaction of both parties, the faculty adviser is consulted. The next step, if one is


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