All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Developing students as public servants from the classroom to the polls
Unformatted Document Text:  Draft: Lindaman and Charles 4 organizations of youth translate into real attitudes towards citizenship. In other words where young citizens not only “practice” citizenship but development attitudes—“voting and concern for others”—regarding citizenship (Sherrod 2003, 287). In college, many youth experience first-time voting and many recall their first remembered course on civics. While the students are encouraged to participate in the political process, the lion’s share of the resources concentrate on GOTV efforts and turnout. Initial and repeated turnout of new voters is a positive determinant of political participation, and the habit of voting may even replace the effects of education and age on turnout (Gerber, Green, Shacher 2003). However habitual participation defined by turnout indicates very little regarding the inherent rights and responsibilities of citizenship, which also includes community service and a contribution to the public good. The question then becomes how are students encouraged to participate in the political process beyond voting? The current trend towards civic engagement would lend students to greater levels of political efficacy. However, this phenomenon is difficult to measure in the classroom as the effects of socialization through the college experience may not surface until years or decades down the road. Thus, building upon our definition of citizenship as public servants, the literature in public administration contributes additional appeal and applicability as we sought college students as citizens to not only contribute to the government process but also to the governance of our American democracy. College students are ripe for this challenge. As budding political animals (majors in political science), public employees (majors in public administration), or social workers (majors in social work), they experience a professional and political socialization

Authors: Lindaman, Kara. and Charles, Ruth.
first   previous   Page 4 of 16   next   last



background image
Draft: Lindaman and Charles
4
organizations of youth translate into real attitudes towards citizenship. In other words
where young citizens not only “practice” citizenship but development attitudes—“voting
and concern for others”—regarding citizenship (Sherrod 2003, 287).
In college, many youth experience first-time voting and many recall their first
remembered course on civics. While the students are encouraged to participate in the
political process, the lion’s share of the resources concentrate on GOTV efforts and
turnout. Initial and repeated turnout of new voters is a positive determinant of political
participation, and the habit of voting may even replace the effects of education and age
on turnout (Gerber, Green, Shacher 2003). However habitual participation defined by
turnout indicates very little regarding the inherent rights and responsibilities of
citizenship, which also includes community service and a contribution to the public good.
The question then becomes how are students encouraged to participate in the
political process beyond voting? The current trend towards civic engagement would lend
students to greater levels of political efficacy. However, this phenomenon is difficult to
measure in the classroom as the effects of socialization through the college experience
may not surface until years or decades down the road. Thus, building upon our definition
of citizenship as public servants, the literature in public administration contributes
additional appeal and applicability as we sought college students as citizens to not only
contribute to the government process but also to the governance of our American
democracy.
College students are ripe for this challenge. As budding political animals (majors
in political science), public employees (majors in public administration), or social
workers (majors in social work), they experience a professional and political socialization


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 16   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.