All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

What Think-Aloud Protocols Can Teach Us about How People Manage Political Information
Unformatted Document Text:  Future Directions In addition to increasing the number of participants in the project (an obvious and important extension of this work), there are numerous other directions in which this work can be taken. This concluding section discusses three such directions and speculates about what may be learned from pursuing each. All are on my current research agenda. What Constitutes an Expert? As a first cut at this project, the participants were divided into novices (students who had taken no more than a single, introductory American government course) and those who were majoring or minoring on political science and had completed at least fifteen credits in the discipline with good grades. The definition of an expert could, and will, be broadened in the future. One obvious extension is to work with faculty members and/or advanced doctoral students in political science. It is likely that a continuum of expertise can be developed, with novice students on one extreme, faculty members and graduate students on the other, and advanced undergraduates in the middle. This will allow for a more stratified understanding of what constitutes expert behavior – it may also suggest “steps” that are taken on the path from novice to expert. But the definition of expert can be extended even more than this. Faculty members and advanced doctoral students certainly have one dimension of expertise in political science. But is it the most relevant one? One could claim that political “practitioners” (such as lobbyists or policy analysts) may have developed an even stronger ability to perform the tasks being discussed here – their livelihood, after all, depends upon an ability to marshal evidence to make a case for their position. Likewise, political officeholders might be considered experts on a task like this. Finally, while they do not usually possess the disciplinary knowledge of faculty members, high school government teachers may possess the “pedagogical content knowledge” (Shulman 1987) that helps them to adapt their abstract knowledge to the classroom setting, a different variety of expertise than the other experts discussed above. This suggests a productive research question is not just the comparison of novices to experts, but also comparing different types of experts against each other. It would be 16

Authors: Bernstein, Jeffrey.
first   previous   Page 18 of 33   next   last



background image
Future Directions
In addition to increasing the number of participants in the project (an obvious and
important extension of this work), there are numerous other directions in which this work
can be taken. This concluding section discusses three such directions and speculates
about what may be learned from pursuing each. All are on my current research agenda.
What Constitutes an Expert?
As a first cut at this project, the participants were divided into novices (students
who had taken no more than a single, introductory American government course) and
those who were majoring or minoring on political science and had completed at least
fifteen credits in the discipline with good grades. The definition of an expert could, and
will, be broadened in the future. One obvious extension is to work with faculty members
and/or advanced doctoral students in political science. It is likely that a continuum of
expertise can be developed, with novice students on one extreme, faculty members and
graduate students on the other, and advanced undergraduates in the middle. This will
allow for a more stratified understanding of what constitutes expert behavior – it may
also suggest “steps” that are taken on the path from novice to expert.
But the definition of expert can be extended even more than this. Faculty
members and advanced doctoral students certainly have one dimension of expertise in
political science. But is it the most relevant one? One could claim that political
“practitioners” (such as lobbyists or policy analysts) may have developed an even
stronger ability to perform the tasks being discussed here – their livelihood, after all,
depends upon an ability to marshal evidence to make a case for their position. Likewise,
political officeholders might be considered experts on a task like this. Finally, while they
do not usually possess the disciplinary knowledge of faculty members, high school
government teachers may possess the “pedagogical content knowledge” (Shulman 1987)
that helps them to adapt their abstract knowledge to the classroom setting, a different
variety of expertise than the other experts discussed above.
This suggests a productive research question is not just the comparison of novices
to experts, but also comparing different types of experts against each other. It would be
16


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 18 of 33   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.