All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Teaching Global Citizens: Following the News
Unformatted Document Text:  Jennifer Rutledge and Serena Laws “Educating Global Citizens” **DRAFT ** course. But we believe including of such issues is vital if we wish to contribute to the goal of educating the global citizen. The politicians for whom our students will vote make decisions that have enormous implications abroad, yet these issues are rarely given much attention in intro American politics classes. I explicitly asked the 1001 instructors what they would think about internationalizing the curriculum by teaching American politics from a more global perspective. A few thought it was a good idea in theory, but said they themselves lacked the skills to do it properly. One was actively opposed to the idea, and said it would not be political science in that case, but more of a history course. An issue that kept coming up that gets to the heart of our concerns was whether this was more an introduction to American politics or to American political science. There was no agreement about this issue—some thought the course should be taught as an introduction to politics, some emphatically thought it should be taught as an introduction to political science and one thought there was no difference between the two. One professor bemoaned the lack of political science in the undergraduate curriculum, and said that political science is one of the worst at preparing students to be political scientists. Unlike psychology or economics where students learn things that make sense for the discipline, “In polisci we tell stories,” and only occasionally do research with undergrads. He believed that undergraduate political science should mirror the discipline—“otherwise we’re nothing more than sophisticated journalists.” In general, there was a marked lack of thought about approach to teaching this course or about what text to use. Many interviewees seemed to care very little about how they taught the course or what they wanted students to get out of it. One said he did not incorporate current events because he teaches the course in such an “ass-over-tea-kettle fashion” that he does not 11

Authors: Rutledge, Jennifer. and Laws, Serena.
first   previous   Page 11 of 29   next   last



background image
Jennifer Rutledge and Serena Laws
“Educating Global Citizens” **DRAFT **
course. But we believe including of such issues is vital if we wish to contribute to the goal of
educating the global citizen. The politicians for whom our students will vote make decisions that
have enormous implications abroad, yet these issues are rarely given much attention in intro
American politics classes.
I explicitly asked the 1001 instructors what they would think about internationalizing the
curriculum by teaching American politics from a more global perspective. A few thought it was a
good idea in theory, but said they themselves lacked the skills to do it properly. One was actively
opposed to the idea, and said it would not be political science in that case, but more of a history
course.
An issue that kept coming up that gets to the heart of our concerns was whether this was
more an introduction to American politics or to American political science. There was no
agreement about this issue—some thought the course should be taught as an introduction to
politics, some emphatically thought it should be taught as an introduction to political science and
one thought there was no difference between the two. One professor bemoaned the lack of
political science in the undergraduate curriculum, and said that political science is one of the
worst at preparing students to be political scientists. Unlike psychology or economics where
students learn things that make sense for the discipline, “In polisci we tell stories,” and only
occasionally do research with undergrads. He believed that undergraduate political science
should mirror the discipline—“otherwise we’re nothing more than sophisticated journalists.”
In general, there was a marked lack of thought about approach to teaching this course or
about what text to use. Many interviewees seemed to care very little about how they taught the
course or what they wanted students to get out of it. One said he did not incorporate current
events because he teaches the course in such an “ass-over-tea-kettle fashion” that he does not
11


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 11 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.