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Teaching Global Citizens: Following the News
Unformatted Document Text:  Jennifer Rutledge and Serena Laws “Educating Global Citizens” **DRAFT ** Introductory Political Science students at the beginning and end of the course. The purposes of the questionnaire were first, to determine students’ motivation for taking the course, and to assess students’ knowledge and interest in current events prior to taking the course. We had three general hypotheses about students in intro classes in mind: first, students who take these courses want to know more about politics, not political science. Second, students who take these courses have a low knowledge of current events. Third, students in both these courses expect to learn more about various aspects of international politics. We administered brief surveys to students in introductory political science courses during the first week of classes. Two of the classes were introduction to global politics courses (POL 1025), and two were introduction to American politics courses (POL 1001). The classes were both for the same number of credits, but they meet different requirements (the "international perspectives theme" requirement and the citizenship requirement, respectively). The surveys were administered during the first week of class in order to try to discern student expectations of course content before the course was fully under way. Two of the surveys were given on the first day of class, the other two were given on the second day of the class, but still in the first week. One global politics class was taught during the day, and one in the evening. The same was true for the American politics course--one was a night class, and one was taught during the day. This ensures that the sample includes both the traditional and non-traditional students found at the University. In each category, one class was taught by a graduate instructor, and the other was taught by a visiting adjunct faculty member. In total, we received questionnaires from 204 intro to American politics students, and from 139 global politics students. The questionnaires were multiple choice in format, with some space to write additional comments. 3 Students were asked about their reasons for choosing to 3 A copy of the complete questionnaire can be found in Appendix B. 17

Authors: Rutledge, Jennifer. and Laws, Serena.
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Jennifer Rutledge and Serena Laws
“Educating Global Citizens” **DRAFT **
Introductory Political Science students at the beginning and end of the course. The purposes of
the questionnaire were first, to determine students’ motivation for taking the course, and to
assess students’ knowledge and interest in current events prior to taking the course. We had three
general hypotheses about students in intro classes in mind: first, students who take these courses
want to know more about politics, not political science. Second, students who take these courses
have a low knowledge of current events. Third, students in both these courses expect to learn
more about various aspects of international politics.
We administered brief surveys to students in introductory political science courses during
the first week of classes. Two of the classes were introduction to global politics courses (POL
1025), and two were introduction to American politics courses (POL 1001). The classes were
both for the same number of credits, but they meet different requirements (the "international
perspectives theme" requirement and the citizenship requirement, respectively). The surveys
were administered during the first week of class in order to try to discern student expectations of
course content before the course was fully under way. Two of the surveys were given on the first
day of class, the other two were given on the second day of the class, but still in the first week.
One global politics class was taught during the day, and one in the evening. The same was true
for the American politics course--one was a night class, and one was taught during the day. This
ensures that the sample includes both the traditional and non-traditional students found at the
University. In each category, one class was taught by a graduate instructor, and the other was
taught by a visiting adjunct faculty member.
In total, we received questionnaires from 204 intro to American politics students, and
from 139 global politics students. The questionnaires were multiple choice in format, with some
space to write additional comments.
Students were asked about their reasons for choosing to
3 A copy of the complete questionnaire can be found in Appendix B.
17


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