All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

CommUniverCity San Jose: A Partnership for Service and Learning
Unformatted Document Text:  outcomes measures included interest in local politics, voter registration and participation, and self-reported levels of health and happiness. In addition to this social capital survey, SJSU students have conducted door-to- door surveys with randomly sampled households in FWBT in the fall semester each year since 2004. These door-to-door surveys were initially designed and conducted by master’s students in urban and regional planning as a service learning project in their quantitative methods course, and included questions about issues such as neighborhood walkability and the adequacy of street lighting. Political science undergraduate students taking a class on public opinion joined the urban and regional planning students starting in fall 2006, conducting the survey as a CommUniverCity project. These annual door-to-door surveys also offer an opportunity to ask more detailed questions about different issues each year as the survey is updated in consultation with the CommUniverCity steering committee and city staff working in the neighborhood. In 2006, for example, questions were added about whether children attended the neighborhood schools or went elsewhere, and the adequacy of on-street parking. Along with collecting valuable data for outcomes assessment, the students involved with the door-to-door survey projects gain hands-on experience designing, conducting, and analyzing surveys. They also learn more about the people living just a few short blocks from campus, as they develop a sense of connection to the community that is all too rare on SJSU’s commuter campus. 26 Student Comments on Door-to-Door Survey Project “Although in the beginning I was not excited about spending a Saturday morning out in the community, in the end I was really glad that I participated. I really feel as though we may have helped make a difference in this community and given the people a voice in the future of their neighborhood.” “We noticed the pride in many of the people we spoke with. Some expressed pride that they had lived in the same neighborhood for more than 50 years, others were proud of their Mexican heritage and still others were proud of younger relatives who were going to college.” “When studying non-response rates in class, I took it as an abstract concept that had no relevance to real life. However, when you’re down on the streets as one of the surveyors, non-response is one of your worst enemies, and you want desperately to have people not shut the door in your face.” “I learned that people are almost always willing to help a student in need… many of the participants always asked me the same questions: “You’re really a student from San José State?” or “This is for San José State?”. Whenever I answered yes, they were more than happy to participate. I never realized that being a member of this university carried so much cachet. The people in the community respected the students from San José State and believed that we were out to accomplish some good.”

Authors: Christensen, Terry., Jackson, Melinda. and Agredano, Ricardo.
first   previous   Page 26 of 32   next   last



background image
outcomes measures included interest in local politics, voter registration and participation,
and self-reported levels of health and happiness.
In addition to this social capital survey, SJSU students have conducted door-to-
door surveys with randomly sampled households in FWBT in the fall semester each year
since 2004. These door-to-door surveys were initially designed and conducted by
master’s students in urban and regional planning as a service learning project in their
quantitative methods course, and included questions about issues such as neighborhood
walkability and the adequacy of street lighting. Political science undergraduate students
taking a class on public opinion joined the urban and regional planning students starting
in fall 2006, conducting the survey as a CommUniverCity project.
These annual door-to-door surveys also offer an opportunity to ask more detailed
questions about different issues each year as the survey is updated in consultation with
the CommUniverCity steering committee and city staff working in the neighborhood. In
2006, for example, questions were added about whether children attended the
neighborhood schools or went elsewhere, and the adequacy of on-street parking.
Along with collecting valuable data for outcomes assessment, the students
involved with the door-to-door survey projects gain hands-on experience designing,
conducting, and analyzing surveys. They also learn more about the people living just a
few short blocks from campus, as they develop a sense of connection to the community
that is all too rare on SJSU’s commuter campus.
26
Student Comments on Door-to-Door Survey Project
“Although in the beginning I was not excited about spending a Saturday morning out in the community,
in the end I was really glad that I participated. I really feel as though we may have helped make a
difference in this community and given the people a voice in the future of their neighborhood.”
“We noticed the pride in many of the people we spoke with. Some expressed pride that they had lived in
the same neighborhood for more than 50 years, others were proud of their Mexican heritage and still
others were proud of younger relatives who were going to college.”
“When studying non-response rates in class, I took it as an abstract concept that had no relevance to real
life. However, when you’re down on the streets as one of the surveyors, non-response is one of your
worst enemies, and you want desperately to have people not shut the door in your face.”
“I learned that people are almost always willing to help a student in need… many of the participants
always asked me the same questions: “You’re really a student from San José State?” or “This is for San
José State?”. Whenever I answered yes, they were more than happy to
participate. I never realized that
being a member of this university carried so much cachet. The people in the community respected the
students
from San José State and believed that we were out to accomplish some good.”


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 26 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.