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For the Students, By the Students: Redirecting Civic Education through the American Trustees Project
Unformatted Document Text:  Lopez, M. H., Levine, P., Both, D., Kiesa, A., Kirby, E. & Marcelo, K. (2006). The 2006 civic and political health of the nation: A detailed look at how youth participate in politics and communities. The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning & Engagement. Retrieved June 26, 2007 from Macedo, S., Alex-Assensoh, Y. M., Berry, J. M., Brintnall, M., Campbell, D. E., Fraga, L. R., Fung, A., Galston, W. A., Karpowitz, C. F., Levi, M., Levinson, M. & Lipsitz, K. (2005). Democracy at Risk: How political choices undermine citizen participation, and what we can do about it. Washington D. C.: Brookings Institution Press. McMillan, J. (2004). The potential for civic learning in higher education: “Teaching democracy by being democratic.” Southern Communication Journal, 69 (3), 188-205. McMillan, J., & Harriger, K. J. (2002). College students and deliberation: A benchmark study. Communication Education, 52 (3), 237-253. Mindich, D. T. Z. (2005). Tuned Out: Why Americans under 40 don’t follow the news. New York: Oxford University Press. Nie, N. H., Junn. J. & Stehlik-Barry, K. (1996). Education and Democratic Citizenship in America. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. Niemi, R. G. & Junn. J. (1998). Civic education: What makes students learn. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling alone: The collapse and revival of American community. New York: Simon & Schuster. Rose, D. (2004). The potential of role-model education, In The encyclopedia of informal education, www.infed.org/biblio/role_model_education.htm. Last updated: January 30, 2005. Schudson, M. (2000). Good citizens and bad history: Today's political ideals in historical perspective. Communication Review, 4(1), 1-19. Sherr, S., & Staples, M. (2004). News for a new generation report 1: content analysis, interviews, and focus groups. The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning & Engagement. Retrieved May 12, 2005 from http://www.civicyouth.org/PopUps/WorkingPapers/WP16Sherr.pdf Sobal, J., Hinrichs, D. W., Emmons, C. F. & Hook, W. F. (1981). Experiential learning in introductory sociology: A course description and evaluation. Teaching Sociology, 9, 401-422. Torney-Purta, J. (2002). The school’s role in developing civic engagement: A study of adolescents in twenty-eight countries. Applied Developmental Science, 6, 203-212. Wattenberg, M. (2002). Where have all the voters gone? Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Weiland, S. (1981). Emerson, experience, and experiential learning. Peabody Journal of Education, 58, 161-167. Zaller, J. (2003). A new standard of news quality: Burglar alarms for the monitorial citizen. Political Communication 20, 109-130. Zukin, C., Keeter, S., Andolia, M., Jenkins, K. & Delli Carpini, M. X. (2006). A New Engagement?: Political participation, civic life, and the changing American citizen. New York: Oxford University Press. www.annettestrauss.org | 13

Authors: Jarvis, Sharon. and Han, Soo-Hye.
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background image
Lopez, M. H., Levine, P., Both, D., Kiesa, A., Kirby, E. & Marcelo, K. (2006). The 2006 civic and
political health of the nation: A detailed look at how youth participate in politics and
communities. The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning & Engagement.
Retrieved June 26, 2007 from
Macedo, S., Alex-Assensoh, Y. M., Berry, J. M., Brintnall, M., Campbell, D. E., Fraga, L. R., Fung,
A., Galston, W. A., Karpowitz, C. F., Levi, M., Levinson, M. & Lipsitz, K. (2005). Democracy
at Risk: How political choices undermine citizen participation, and what we can do about it
.
Washington D. C.: Brookings Institution Press.
McMillan, J. (2004). The potential for civic learning in higher education: “Teaching democracy by
being democratic.” Southern Communication Journal, 69 (3), 188-205.
McMillan, J., & Harriger, K. J. (2002). College students and deliberation: A benchmark study.
Communication Education, 52 (3), 237-253.
Mindich, D. T. Z. (2005). Tuned Out: Why Americans under 40 don’t follow the news. New York:
Oxford University Press.
Nie, N. H., Junn. J. & Stehlik-Barry, K. (1996). Education and Democratic Citizenship in America.
Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
Niemi, R. G. & Junn. J. (1998). Civic education: What makes students learn. New Haven, CT: Yale
University Press.
Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling alone: The collapse and revival of American community. New York:
Simon & Schuster.
Rose, D. (2004). The potential of role-model education, In The encyclopedia of informal education,
www.infed.org/biblio/role_model_education.htm. Last updated: January 30, 2005.
Schudson, M. (2000). Good citizens and bad history: Today's political ideals in historical perspective.
Communication Review, 4(1), 1-19.
Sherr, S., & Staples, M. (2004). News for a new generation report 1: content analysis, interviews, and
focus groups. The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning & Engagement.
Retrieved May 12, 2005 from
Sobal, J., Hinrichs, D. W., Emmons, C. F. & Hook, W. F. (1981). Experiential learning in introductory
sociology: A course description and evaluation. Teaching Sociology, 9, 401-422.
Torney-Purta, J. (2002). The school’s role in developing civic engagement: A study of adolescents in
twenty-eight countries. Applied Developmental Science, 6, 203-212.
Wattenberg, M. (2002). Where have all the voters gone? Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Weiland, S. (1981). Emerson, experience, and experiential learning. Peabody Journal of Education,
58, 161-167.
Zaller, J. (2003). A new standard of news quality: Burglar alarms for the monitorial citizen. Political
Communication 20, 109-130.
Zukin, C., Keeter, S., Andolia, M., Jenkins, K. & Delli Carpini, M. X. (2006). A New Engagement?:
Political participation, civic life, and the changing American citizen. New York: Oxford
University Press.
www.annettestrauss.org | 13


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