All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

For the Students, By the Students: Redirecting Civic Education through the American Trustees Project
Unformatted Document Text:  overall length of the definitions suggest, the definitions became considerably longer with time. One intriguing addition was the inclusion of emotive and ownership terms. For instance, inspire appeared three times at the end of the semester (and did not appear at time 1), social appeared four times at the end of the semester (and did not appear at time 1), change appeared three times at the end of the semester (and did not appear at time 1), care appeared twice at the end of the semester (appearing once at time 1), difference appeared four times (and did not appear at time 1), passion appeared three times at the end of the semester (and did not appear at time 1), and duty appeared three times at the end of the semester (and did not appear at time 1). As these word counts suggest, the definitions became broader, more comprehensive, accessible and proximate. For instance, definitions at the start of the course focused on links to a location, to politics, to individualistic efforts, and to national level concerns. Definitions at the end of the semester often featured these notions, but they also explained how citizenship can also be regarded as linked to communities, civic engagement, collective efforts, relationships with others, and local and global considerations. Additionally, the definitions at the end of the class featured more emotive terms, a general increase in efficacy and an increase in optimism. Good CitizensAt the beginning of the semester, 37% of student responses named national figures as “good citizens”: (e.g., Senator Barack Obama, Mayor Rudy Giuliani, Martin Luther King Jr., etc.). At the end of the semester, just 15% did. After completing the American Trustees project, students were more likely to mention their Trustees (30%), their friends and relatives (31%), and other local individuals (8%) as good citizens. It appears that the act of identifying named citizens became easier (or more attractive) over time. At the beginning of the semester, 22.9% of student responses named individuals engaging in “occupations” as good citizens (e.g., public servants, soldiers, garbage guys, public sphere participants); at the end, just 2.6% used such abstractions to refer to good citizens. Students were also asked to describe what good citizens do. At the beginning of the semester, good citizens were described as politically informed, obedient and law-abiding. Consider these definitions offered by students at the start of the course: • “Good citizens follow all laws, pay taxes and vote. They are aware of local and national politics.” • “Good citizens vote and serve in the military.” At the end of the semester, good citizenship was more nuanced. Good citizens were reported as not just political and legal persons, but also community participants who are compassionate and willing to help others in everyday life. Notice how the following definitions, provided at the end of the semester, are more layered, more pro-active, and more accessible to a broader set of individuals: • “Good citizens are those who understand that they must participate in community events and in the political arena.” • “Good citizens are those who make a change in their community.” • “Good citizens are those who work with members in their community to help others.” • “Good citizens are those who try to help others without having selfish motivations.” • “Good citizens care for everyone around them.” www.annettestrauss.org | 8

Authors: Jarvis, Sharon. and Han, Soo-Hye.
first   previous   Page 8 of 13   next   last



background image
overall length of the definitions suggest, the definitions became considerably longer with time. One
intriguing addition was the inclusion of emotive and ownership terms. For instance, inspire appeared
three times at the end of the semester (and did not appear at time 1), social appeared four times at the
end of the semester (and did not appear at time 1), change appeared three times at the end of the
semester (and did not appear at time 1), care appeared twice at the end of the semester (appearing once
at time 1), difference appeared four times (and did not appear at time 1), passion appeared three times
at the end of the semester (and did not appear at time 1), and duty appeared three times at the end of the
semester (and did not appear at time 1).
As these word counts suggest, the definitions became broader, more comprehensive, accessible and
proximate. For instance, definitions at the start of the course focused on links to a location, to politics,
to individualistic efforts, and to national level concerns. Definitions at the end of the semester often
featured these notions, but they also explained how citizenship can also be regarded as linked to
communities, civic engagement, collective efforts, relationships with others, and local and global
considerations. Additionally, the definitions at the end of the class featured more emotive terms, a
general increase in efficacy and an increase in optimism.
Good Citizens
At the beginning of the semester, 37% of student responses named national figures as “good citizens”:
(e.g., Senator Barack Obama, Mayor Rudy Giuliani, Martin Luther King Jr., etc.). At the end of the
semester, just 15% did. After completing the American Trustees project, students were more likely to
mention their Trustees (30%), their friends and relatives (31%), and other local individuals (8%) as
good citizens. It appears that the act of identifying named citizens became easier (or more attractive)
over time. At the beginning of the semester, 22.9% of student responses named individuals engaging in
“occupations” as good citizens (e.g., public servants, soldiers, garbage guys, public sphere
participants); at the end, just 2.6% used such abstractions to refer to good citizens.
Students were also asked to describe what good citizens do. At the beginning of the semester, good
citizens were described as politically informed, obedient and law-abiding. Consider these definitions
offered by students at the start of the course:
“Good citizens follow all laws, pay taxes and vote. They are aware of local and national
politics.”
“Good citizens vote and serve in the military.”
At the end of the semester, good citizenship was more nuanced. Good citizens were reported as
not just political and legal persons, but also community participants who are compassionate and
willing to help others in everyday life. Notice how the following definitions, provided at the end of the
semester, are more layered, more pro-active, and more accessible to a broader set of individuals:
“Good citizens are those who understand that they must participate in community events and
in the political arena.”
“Good citizens are those who make a change in their community.”
“Good citizens are those who work with members in their community to help others.”
“Good citizens are those who try to help others without having selfish motivations.”
“Good citizens care for everyone around them.”
www.annettestrauss.org | 8


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 8 of 13   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.