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When is a Novel not a Novel: When It is Used to Teach Political Science
Unformatted Document Text:  morning” (48) and “suddenly the odor of kerosene made him vomit” (49). Thrust into moderating a debate between Faber and Beatty, his “head whirled sickeningly” (107). Just before the death of Beatty, Montag feels an earthquake “shaking and falling and shivering inside him and he stood there, his knees half bent under the great load of tiredness and outrage” (118). After Beatty’s death, “Montag kept his sickness down long enough” (120). While being dragged out of the cave is an important element, a character-driven analysis should also consider the “someone” who does the dragging out of the cave. The choice of illustrative characters, Faber and Granger, is fairly simple. Faber admits that “we do need knowledge” (86) but he is initially reluctant to join Montag. Later, he continues the work of Clarisse by helping Montag escape. In the novel, Faber helps Montag escape from the police. In the metaphor, he helps Montag escape from the cave. “I feel like I’m doing what I should’ve done a lifetime ago. For a little while I’m not afraid. Maybe it’s because I’m doing the right thing at last” (131). Continuing the work of Faber, and helping Montag on his journey out of the city and out of the cave is Granger. Their world, their cave, had been destroyed in an instant. In the aftermath, there would be “a lot of lonely people” (164). These survivors would be trying to find their own path “along the rough steep, upward way.” Granger and his companions “can be of some use in the world,” (152) by leading them into the light. The final aspect of the Allegory consists of the return to the cave. When faced with the choice of returning to the shadows of the cave, Glaucon concludes that the former inhabitant of the cave “would prefer to undergo everything rather than live that way” (516d). The choice of characters is, in one case, textually obvious. The unnamed

Authors: Connor, George.
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morning” (48) and “suddenly the odor of kerosene made him vomit” (49). Thrust into
moderating a debate between Faber and Beatty, his “head whirled sickeningly” (107).
Just before the death of Beatty, Montag feels an earthquake “shaking and falling and
shivering inside him and he stood there, his knees half bent under the great load of
tiredness and outrage” (118). After Beatty’s death, “Montag kept his sickness down long
enough” (120).
While being dragged out of the cave is an important element, a character-driven
analysis should also consider the “someone” who does the dragging out of the cave. The
choice of illustrative characters, Faber and Granger, is fairly simple. Faber admits that
“we do need knowledge” (86) but he is initially reluctant to join Montag. Later, he
continues the work of Clarisse by helping Montag escape. In the novel, Faber helps
Montag escape from the police. In the metaphor, he helps Montag escape from the cave.
“I feel like I’m doing what I should’ve done a lifetime ago. For a little while I’m not
afraid. Maybe it’s because I’m doing the right thing at last” (131). Continuing the work
of Faber, and helping Montag on his journey out of the city and out of the cave is
Granger. Their world, their cave, had been destroyed in an instant. In the aftermath,
there would be “a lot of lonely people” (164). These survivors would be trying to find
their own path “along the rough steep, upward way.” Granger and his companions “can
be of some use in the world,” (152) by leading them into the light.
The final aspect of the Allegory consists of the return to the cave. When faced
with the choice of returning to the shadows of the cave, Glaucon concludes that the
former inhabitant of the cave “would prefer to undergo everything rather than live that
way” (516d). The choice of characters is, in one case, textually obvious. The unnamed


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