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Using Classic and Contemporary Literature to Explore Themes in Law and Politics
Unformatted Document Text:  Melville Davisson Post, “The Corpus Delecti” (Gemmette)Jack London, “The Benefit of the Doubt” (Gemmette) The Best and Worst GovernmentPolitics in Literature: Utopia and Dystopia (June 12, Session 1)Readings:Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale, Chapters 5-7 Recommended Dystopian Works:Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451Aldous Huxley, Brave New World Sinclair Lewis, It Can’t Happen HereJack London, Iron HeelGeorge Orwell, 1984Ayn Rand, Anthem Political Power in Foreign AffairsPolitics in Literature: Imperialism and Colonialism (June 12, Session 2)Reading:George Orwell, “Shooting an Elephant” (online)Rudyard Kipling, “The White Man’s Burden” (online) Recommended Readings:Chinua Achebe, Things Fall ApartJoseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness George Orwell, Burmese Days Short Paper Project: Discuss the following questions in a 3-4 page paper: How does Orwell (as the colonial police officer) feel about the British presence in Burma? How does he feel about his job with the Indian Imperial police and what is his attitude toward the native peoples? What does Orwell tell us is the “true nature of imperialism”? Orwell repeatedly states in the text that he does not want to shoot the elephant. In addition, by the time that he has found the elephant, the animal has become calm and has ceased to be an immediate danger. Despite this, the officer feels compelled to execute the creature. Why? Do you think that the officer used his authority properly? Explain your answer. Would you have acted differently if you were in that situation? Briefly discuss. This paper is due June 12. The Best and Worst GovernmentPolitics in Literature: Utopia and Dystopia (June 13, Session 1)Readings:Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale, Chapters 8-9 The Judicial ProcessLaw in Literature: The Jury System (June 13, Session 2)Readings:Robert O’Neil Bristow, “Beyond Any Doubt” (Gemmette) Page | 28

Authors: Fliter, John.
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background image
Melville Davisson Post, “The Corpus Delecti” (Gemmette)
Jack London, “The Benefit of the Doubt” (Gemmette)
The Best and Worst Government
Politics in Literature: Utopia and Dystopia
(June 12, Session 1)
Readings:
Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale, Chapters 5-7
Recommended Dystopian Works:
Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World
Sinclair Lewis, It Can’t Happen Here
Jack London, Iron Heel
George Orwell, 1984
Ayn Rand, Anthem
Political Power in Foreign Affairs
Politics in Literature: Imperialism and Colonialism
(June 12, Session 2)
Reading:
George Orwell, “Shooting an Elephant” (online)
Rudyard Kipling, “The White Man’s Burden” (online)
Recommended Readings:
Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness
George Orwell, Burmese Days
Short Paper Project: Discuss the following questions in a 3-4 page paper: How does Orwell (as the
colonial police officer) feel about the British presence in Burma? How does he feel about his job with the
Indian Imperial police and what is his attitude toward the native peoples? What does Orwell tell us is the
“true nature of imperialism”? Orwell repeatedly states in the text that he does not want to shoot the
elephant. In addition, by the time that he has found the elephant, the animal has become calm and has
ceased to be an immediate danger. Despite this, the officer feels compelled to execute the creature. Why?
Do you think that the officer used his authority properly? Explain your answer. Would you have acted
differently if you were in that situation? Briefly discuss. This paper is due June 12.
The Best and Worst Government
Politics in Literature: Utopia and Dystopia
(June 13, Session 1)
Readings:
Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale, Chapters 8-9
The Judicial Process
Law in Literature: The Jury System
(June 13, Session 2)
Readings:
Robert O’Neil Bristow, “Beyond Any Doubt” (Gemmette)
Page | 28


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