All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Separation of Church and State: Constitutional Policy in Conflict
Unformatted Document Text:  Separation of Church and State: Constitutional Policy in Conflict 28 Carlism has two hallmark theocratic philosophies: It sees ultra-orthodox Catholicism as the cornerstone of the State. Secondly, sovereignty is vested not with the people, but with a monarch, who is answerable only to the Catholic Church (Cocozelli Part 8, 2006; ( http://www.opusdei.org/ ). American Carlists believe in tradition, family, and property, and are influenced by Carlism philosophies, such as Dr. Alexandra Wilhelmsen, John Newhaus, Justice Robert H. Bork and George Weigel, all of whom are Neo-Conservatives as well. Wilhelmsen taught at the Opus Dei- founded University of Navarra in Pampalonna, Spain, and then settled at the University of Dallas, which today, is the home to the extreme Catholic Right---according to Cocozelli and other critics. Opus Dei means “The Work of God” and was founded in Spain in 1928 by Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer, a Carlist and also a priest who wanted to create a Catholic lay society in which Catholics could achieve “holiness” through their everyday work: through a combination of prayer, principle and unquestioned adherence to Catholic teachings on all social issues, and there would be no religious dissent, but that members continue the important Catholic goal of evangelism. Escriva put down his ideas in The Way in 1934 (Cocozelli 2006; ( http://www.opusdei.org/ ). “The Work” is in essence Opus Dei, “…the whole sanctification is the Work of a lifetime” (ibid). The Work has approximately 80,000 members worldwide with over 3,000 members in the United States. Some reports state the Society has up to 200,000 members worldwide (Smith 2005 at www.abc.net.au/lateline ; http://www.mon.at/opusdei/ ). Opus Dei utilizes an internal cast-like structure of “numeraries” [unmarried, celebrate members], “supernumeraries” [married members], and “cooperators [sympathetic non-members].” Jesuit Father Michael Walsh described Opus Dei members “…as being deeply involved in political and economic machinations, often with an ultra-conservative bent” (2006). Opus Dei is openly more concerned and inspired with the economic self-interest of “friends” who are already enormously wealthy and have power (Ibid). The Society does, however, help some poor young children and adults through various programs ( www.opusdei.org ).

Authors: Oberbauer, Angela.
first   previous   Page 28 of 40   next   last



background image
Separation of Church and State: Constitutional Policy in Conflict 28
Carlism has two hallmark theocratic philosophies: It sees ultra-orthodox Catholicism as the
cornerstone of the State. Secondly, sovereignty is vested not with the people, but with a monarch,
who is answerable only to the Catholic Church (Cocozelli Part 8, 2006; (
http://www.opusdei.org/
).
American Carlists believe in tradition, family, and property, and are influenced by Carlism
philosophies, such as Dr. Alexandra Wilhelmsen, John Newhaus, Justice Robert H. Bork and
George Weigel, all of whom are Neo-Conservatives as well. Wilhelmsen taught at the Opus Dei-
founded University of Navarra in Pampalonna, Spain, and then settled at the University of Dallas,
which today, is the home to the extreme Catholic Right---according to Cocozelli and other critics.
Opus Dei means “The Work of God” and was founded in Spain in 1928 by Josemaria Escriva de
Balaguer, a Carlist and also a priest who wanted to create a Catholic lay society in which Catholics
could achieve “holiness” through their everyday work: through a combination of prayer, principle
and unquestioned adherence to Catholic teachings on all social issues, and there would be no
religious dissent, but that members continue the important Catholic goal of evangelism. Escriva put
down his ideas in The Way in 1934 (Cocozelli 2006; (
http://www.opusdei.org/
).
“The Work” is in essence Opus Dei, “…the whole sanctification is the Work of a lifetime”
(ibid).
The Work has approximately 80,000 members worldwide with over 3,000 members in the
United States. Some reports state the Society has up to 200,000 members worldwide (Smith 2005
at
www.abc.net.au/lateline
;
http://www.mon.at/opusdei/
).
Opus Dei utilizes an internal cast-like structure of “numeraries” [unmarried, celebrate
members], “supernumeraries” [married members], and “cooperators [sympathetic non-members].”
Jesuit Father Michael Walsh described Opus Dei members “…as being deeply involved in political
and economic machinations, often with an ultra-conservative bent” (2006). Opus Dei is openly
more concerned and inspired with the economic self-interest of “friends” who are already
enormously wealthy and have power (Ibid). The Society does, however, help some poor young
children and adults through various programs (
www.opusdei.org
).


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 28 of 40   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.