All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Reacting to the Past: Extended Simulations and the Learning Experience in Political Science
Unformatted Document Text:  perceived critical and analytical thinking. I measured this by responses to three survey questions: “Were you encouraged to think critically and analytically?”, “Were you inspired to examine the strengths and weaknesses of your own views on a topic or issue?”, and “Did the instructor ask you to analyze actual real world problems or cases?” The second difference I expected to find involved active learning. The games require a good amount of cooperation within the factions and conflict between them. Anecdotal evidence from the students themselves suggested that the level of active involvement in the Reacting classes was high as well. I expected that levels of perceived active involvement by the students in the Reacting classes would be different from the more conventional Cornerstone seminars. I meas- ured levels of active learning by responses to four questions: “Did you work with other students on projects during class?”, “Did you work with classmates outside of class to prepare class as- signments?”, “Were you actively involved in the learning process through hands-on activities?”, and “Did you make a class presentation?” The final difference I expected to find was in the development of synthetic learning. The use of different Reacting games in the courses requires a good deal of thinking about how to apply different perspectives to analysis of social processes. The experience of the games should bring this point home strongly, especially in light of the detrimental effects of not taking theoretical flexibility seriously for the players. I expected that students in the Reacting classes would per- ceive higher levels of synthetic learning in their courses. I measured this with four questions from the survey: “Were you asked to include diverse perspectives (race, gender, religion) in class?”, “Did coursework emphasize synthesizing and organizing ideas, information, or experi- ences?”, “Did coursework emphasize making judgments about the value of information, argu- 12

Authors: Lightcap, Tracy.
first   previous   Page 12 of 21   next   last



background image
perceived critical and analytical thinking. I measured this by responses to three survey questions:
“Were you encouraged to think critically and analytically?”, “Were you inspired to examine the
strengths and weaknesses of your own views on a topic or issue?”, and “Did the instructor ask
you to analyze actual real world problems or cases?”
The second difference I expected to find involved active learning. The games require a good
amount of cooperation within the factions and conflict between them. Anecdotal evidence from
the students themselves suggested that the level of active involvement in the Reacting classes
was high as well. I expected that levels of perceived active involvement by the students in the
Reacting classes would be different from the more conventional Cornerstone seminars. I meas-
ured levels of active learning by responses to four questions: “Did you work with other students
on projects during class?”, “Did you work with classmates outside of class to prepare class as-
signments?”, “Were you actively involved in the learning process through hands-on activities?”,
and “Did you make a class presentation?”
The final difference I expected to find was in the development of synthetic learning. The use
of different Reacting games in the courses requires a good deal of thinking about how to apply
different perspectives to analysis of social processes. The experience of the games should bring
this point home strongly, especially in light of the detrimental effects of not taking theoretical
flexibility seriously for the players. I expected that students in the Reacting classes would per-
ceive higher levels of synthetic learning in their courses. I measured this with four questions
from the survey: “Were you asked to include diverse perspectives (race, gender, religion) in
class?”, “Did coursework emphasize synthesizing and organizing ideas, information, or experi-
ences?”, “Did coursework emphasize making judgments about the value of information, argu-
12


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 12 of 21   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.