All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Reacting to the Past: Extended Simulations and the Learning Experience in Political Science
Unformatted Document Text:  to those faced by Iraqis might activate and develop their critical faculties and insure their en- gagement with the ideas at the center of the course. Second, this focus gave me an opportunity to show the direct relevance of political ideologies for creating political order. One of the failings of political understanding among students today is an understandable, but mistaken, focus on the use of coercion. The general opinion seems to be that order is the result of using overwhelming force to override resistance. In preparation for the Reacting games, students were tasked with reading selections from Indian writers (Gandhi, Ne- hru, Jinnah and their predecessors), Rousseau’s The Social Contract, and excerpts from Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France. Since the theories of these writers are relevant to win- ning the games themselves, students would learn that success in political conflicts is as depend- ent on ideological justification and persuasion as force. The relevance of political thought and its use as a political weapon would become evident as we proceeded. Reacting Games as Extended Simulations I built the seminar around two Reacting games - Rousseau, Burke, and the Revolution in France, 1791 (Carnes and Kates 2005, hereinafter the French Revolution game) and Defining a Nation: India on the Eve of Independence, 1945 (Embree and Carnes 2005, hereinafter the India game). Playing the India game would provide students with insights into the difficulty of reach- ing decisions about new political institutions in faulted societies under conditions of military oc- cupation, even when all sides appear to agree on the primary goals. The French Revolution game, on the other hand, would show the difficulties of establishing political institutions when no sovereign government exists and public order has largely collapsed. 3

Authors: Lightcap, Tracy.
first   previous   Page 3 of 21   next   last



background image
to those faced by Iraqis might activate and develop their critical faculties and insure their en-
gagement with the ideas at the center of the course.
Second, this focus gave me an opportunity to show the direct relevance of political ideologies
for creating political order. One of the failings of political understanding among students today is
an understandable, but mistaken, focus on the use of coercion. The general opinion seems to be
that order is the result of using overwhelming force to override resistance. In preparation for the
Reacting games, students were tasked with reading selections from Indian writers (Gandhi, Ne-
hru, Jinnah and their predecessors), Rousseau’s The Social Contract, and excerpts from Burke’s
Reflections on the Revolution in France. Since the theories of these writers are relevant to win-
ning the games themselves, students would learn that success in political conflicts is as depend-
ent on ideological justification and persuasion as force. The relevance of political thought and its
use as a political weapon would become evident as we proceeded.
Reacting Games as Extended Simulations
I built the seminar around two Reacting games - Rousseau, Burke, and the Revolution in
France, 1791 (Carnes and Kates 2005, hereinafter the French Revolution game) and Defining a
Nation: India on the Eve of Independence, 1945 (Embree and Carnes 2005, hereinafter the India
game). Playing the India game would provide students with insights into the difficulty of reach-
ing decisions about new political institutions in faulted societies under conditions of military oc-
cupation, even when all sides appear to agree on the primary goals. The French Revolution
game, on the other hand, would show the difficulties of establishing political institutions when
no sovereign government exists and public order has largely collapsed.
3


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 21   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.