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Internationalizing the Curriculum: Study Abroad as a Tool for Redefining and Reconstructing National Identity in a Global Context
Unformatted Document Text:  France & Rogers 12 According to George Kamberelis and Greg Dimitriadis (2005), this form of collective questioning can create synergy among participants that often leads to the unearthing of information seldom ready-to-hand in individual memory. Focus groups also facilitate the exploration of collective memories and shared stocks of knowledge that may seem trivial and unimportant to individuals but come to the fore as crucial when like-minded groups begin to revel in the everyday (p.903). Not only were students able to add to each other’s recollection of experiences, but they even began to challenge one another in conversations about their changing opinions and conceptions of national identity. Each student interviewed had traveled abroad before; experiences ranged from one student who had only spent a few hours in Tijuana, Mexico, on a car ride with a family member to another student who had studied for a year in Buenos Aires, Argentina, during high school. Other students had taken trips ranging from weeks to months to Western Europe, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. As for the nature of these trips, they were family vacations, service trips, and mission trips. Each of the students interviewed was white and a native U.S. Citizen. Their home-states ranged from Maine to South Carolina, but were limited to the east coast. Because the study abroad trip was conducted through the political science department, the majority of the students were political science majors, with the exception of one who as a Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Anthropology double major and another who was a Music major. Eight of the students were juniors, one was a senior, and one was a freshmen. Three of the students were men and seven were women. One of the students (the one who had studied in Argentina) was fluent in Spanish, four had completed the College of Charleston language requirement with Spanish (12 hours), one had completed 6 hours of Spanish classes, and two had never taken any Spanish instruction. CIRCULATION OF THIS PAPER IS NOT PERMITTED WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE AUTHORS.

Authors: France, Hollis. and Rogers, Kaylee.
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France & Rogers 12
According to George Kamberelis and Greg Dimitriadis (2005), this form of collective
questioning can create
synergy among participants that often leads to the unearthing of information seldom
ready-to-hand in individual memory. Focus groups also facilitate the exploration of
collective memories and shared stocks of knowledge that may seem trivial and
unimportant to individuals but come to the fore as crucial when like-minded groups begin
to revel in the everyday (p.903).
Not only were students able to add to each other’s recollection of experiences, but they
even began to challenge one another in conversations about their changing opinions and
conceptions of national identity.
Each student interviewed had traveled abroad before; experiences ranged from
one student who had only spent a few hours in Tijuana, Mexico, on a car ride with a family
member to another student who had studied for a year in Buenos Aires, Argentina, during high
school. Other students had taken trips ranging from weeks to months to Western Europe, Africa,
Latin America, and the Caribbean. As for the nature of these trips, they were family vacations,
service trips, and mission trips. Each of the students interviewed was white and a native U.S.
Citizen. Their home-states ranged from Maine to South Carolina, but were limited to the east
coast. Because the study abroad trip was conducted through the political science department, the
majority of the students were political science majors, with the exception of one who as a Latin
American and Caribbean Studies and Anthropology double major and another who was a Music
major. Eight of the students were juniors, one was a senior, and one was a freshmen. Three of
the students were men and seven were women. One of the students (the one who had studied in
Argentina) was fluent in Spanish, four had completed the College of Charleston language
requirement with Spanish (12 hours), one had completed 6 hours of Spanish classes, and two had
never taken any Spanish instruction.
CIRCULATION OF THIS PAPER IS NOT PERMITTED WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE AUTHORS.


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