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Internationalizing the Curriculum: Study Abroad as a Tool for Redefining and Reconstructing National Identity in a Global Context
Unformatted Document Text:  France & Rogers 5 the position Lynda King and John Young of Oregon State University as take of the necessity to employ business marketing tools for selling study abroad: In terms present-day students and budget committees understand best, we have to sell study abroad better, and to this end, we could take a lesson from successful businesses by thinking in terms of marketing: the benefits of our product (study abroad) have to be made clear to potential customers (students) so that they will choose the product. Businesses determine how best to market a product in part by researching who their potential customers are and what they know and think about the product. Following this approach, we must learn more about our “consumers” prejudices, desires and opinions about study abroad (1994, p.77). Building on this idea of study abroad as a commodity, Mell Bolen in her article, “Consumerism and U.S. Study Abroad,” asserts that, “study abroad now fits into the consumer ethos as a means to earning more money and enjoying the American standard of living” (2001, p. 187). American universities and colleges, like their government counterparts, extol the virtues of study abroad as a means to becoming competitive in the job market upon graduation. For example Boston University in its study abroad brochure emphasized to students, “You are no longer competing for jobs solely with graduates from the university down the street; you are competing with bright, multi-lingual students from around the world” (Perkins, 1995, p.1 in Bolen, 2001, p.187). As this statement demonstrates, emphasis is placed on attaining global experiences that buttress resumes and make students more attractive to employers. In turn, the end result that students can look forward to is earning enough money to live the America dream. A dream that Bolen, drawing on Glickman’s work, “Inventing the American Standard of Living: Gender, race and working-class identity,” asserts is premised on the idea that when workers earn enough money and more leisure time they can then engage in spending on material comforts and pleasures (Glickman 1993 in Bolen, 2001, p.187). Again citing Glickman’s work Bolen concludes, “this ideology continues to bolster arguments for better working conditions, but it CIRCULATION OF THIS PAPER IS NOT PERMITTED WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE AUTHORS.

Authors: France, Hollis. and Rogers, Kaylee.
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France & Rogers 5
the position Lynda King and John Young of Oregon State University as take of the necessity to
employ business marketing tools for selling study abroad:
In terms present-day students and budget committees understand best, we have to sell
study abroad better, and to this end, we could take a lesson from successful businesses by
thinking in terms of marketing: the benefits of our product (study abroad) have to be
made clear to potential customers (students) so that they will choose the product.
Businesses determine how best to market a product in part by researching who their
potential customers are and what they know and think about the product. Following this
approach, we must learn more about our “consumers” prejudices, desires and opinions
about study abroad (1994, p.77).
Building on this idea of study abroad as a commodity, Mell Bolen in her article,
“Consumerism and U.S. Study Abroad,” asserts that, “study abroad now fits into the consumer
ethos as a means to earning more money and enjoying the American standard of living” (2001, p.
187). American universities and colleges, like their government counterparts, extol the virtues of
study abroad as a means to becoming competitive in the job market upon graduation. For
example Boston University in its study abroad brochure emphasized to students, “You are no
longer competing for jobs solely with graduates from the university down the street; you are
competing with bright, multi-lingual students from around the world” (Perkins, 1995, p.1 in
Bolen, 2001, p.187). As this statement demonstrates, emphasis is placed on attaining global
experiences that buttress resumes and make students more attractive to employers. In turn, the
end result that students can look forward to is earning enough money to live the America dream.
A dream that Bolen, drawing on Glickman’s work, “Inventing the American Standard of Living:
Gender, race and working-class identity,” asserts is premised on the idea that when workers earn
enough money and more leisure time they can then engage in spending on material comforts and
pleasures (Glickman 1993 in Bolen, 2001, p.187). Again citing Glickman’s work Bolen
concludes, “this ideology continues to bolster arguments for better working conditions, but it
CIRCULATION OF THIS PAPER IS NOT PERMITTED WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE AUTHORS.


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