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Global Learning for Engaged Citizenship: A Model for Internationalizing the Curriculum
Unformatted Document Text:  Yet, we are also reminded that corporate positions to which our graduates aspire are often filled by employees on a worldwide basis as the chairman of JP Morgan Chase noted: Employers may hire qualified chemists, engineers, physicians and other highly trained people in India or China at a fraction of the cost of such people in our own country. To cite an example – at JP Morgan Chase, we now have over 6,000 people working for us in India in a technology/operations-based center that is much more than just a call-center shop (Harrison 2006, 401). Brown (2006) reminds us that approximately 1 million jobs were lost in the United States, Europe and Japan, which contributes to the throngs many ‘global discontents’ within the developed world. While students as consumers certainly benefit from the inexpensive goods imported into the United States, they – as do many others – often view globalization as a loss of jobs. This is substantiated by Harrison’s frank assertion that this is indeed the case. While our task in internationalizing the curriculum is not to address globalization, we are, to be truthful, responding to globalization’s increasing influence on our lives. Would we even be worried about creating such large-scale academic models if transformative global changes were not underway? I think not. Instead, colleges and universities would relegate their “international” offerings to study abroad opportunities aimed at a select few students who already possessed extensive language and international relations skills. This is the way it used to be thirty or forty years ago. Today, our model of internationalizing the curriculum focuses on a much broader audience – one that possesses few language skills beyond English and has probably not taken any international relations courses. 11

Authors: Zebich-Knos, Michele.
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Yet, we are also reminded that corporate positions to which our graduates aspire are often
filled by employees on a worldwide basis as the chairman of JP Morgan Chase noted:
Employers may hire qualified chemists, engineers, physicians and other highly
trained people in India or China at a fraction of the cost of such people in our own
country. To cite an example – at JP Morgan Chase, we now have over 6,000
people working for us in India in a technology/operations-based center that is
much more than just a call-center shop (Harrison 2006, 401).
Brown (2006) reminds us that approximately 1 million jobs were lost in the United
States, Europe and Japan, which contributes to the throngs many ‘global discontents’
within the developed world. While students as consumers certainly benefit from the
inexpensive goods imported into the United States, they – as do many others – often view
globalization as a loss of jobs. This is substantiated by Harrison’s frank assertion that
this is indeed the case. While our task in internationalizing the curriculum is not to
address globalization, we are, to be truthful, responding to globalization’s increasing
influence on our lives.
Would we even be worried about creating such large-scale academic models if
transformative global changes were not underway? I think not. Instead, colleges and
universities would relegate their “international” offerings to study abroad opportunities
aimed at a select few students who already possessed extensive language and
international relations skills. This is the way it used to be thirty or forty years ago.
Today, our model of internationalizing the curriculum focuses on a much broader
audience – one that possesses few language skills beyond English and has probably not
taken any international relations courses.
11


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