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Global Learning for Engaged Citizenship: A Model for Internationalizing the Curriculum
Unformatted Document Text:  reflect the employers’ assumption that students should already know about government from their high school civics classes. Among twelve key areas of graduates’ preparedness that appeared in the survey “How Should Colleges Assess And Improve Student Learning?” employers rank global knowledge last (Assoc. of American Colleges and Universities 2006b, 3). While 81-83 percent felt graduates were well prepared in teamwork, ethical judgment and intercultural skills, 46 percent of employer respondents believed that graduates were not well prepared in global knowledge. This information affirms the belief that a global learning model is important and can serve student needs after graduation. Naturally, the very activities which contribute to our first objective (knowledge) such as study abroad, global internships, and global content courses also contribute to the second and third objectives. Hence, while we separate global learning into three discrete objectives for purposes of pedagogical clarity, they are, in fact, interconnected and operate simultaneously. Our third category of learning outcomes seeks to shape student attitudes and enhance global citizenship. This objective is one that employers in the above-mentioned surveys failed to mention perhaps because they see less practical relevance to their corporations and already believe that graduates adequately exhibit “social responsibility.” In the “How Should Colleges Assess And Improve Student Learning?” survey, employer respondents believed that 79 percent of graduates are prepared in the area of social responsibility (Assoc. of American Colleges and Universities 2006b, 3). A further breakdown of the data reveals that respondents believed that 35 percent of graduates are “very well prepared” in the social responsibility category while only 18 percent were “very well prepared” in global knowledge. Clearly colleges and universities have more 9

Authors: Zebich-Knos, Michele.
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reflect the employers’ assumption that students should already know about government
from their high school civics classes.
Among twelve key areas of graduates’ preparedness that appeared in the survey
“How Should Colleges Assess And Improve Student Learning?” employers rank global
knowledge last (Assoc. of American Colleges and Universities 2006b, 3). While 81-83
percent felt graduates were well prepared in teamwork, ethical judgment and intercultural
skills, 46 percent of employer respondents believed that graduates were not well prepared
in global knowledge. This information affirms the belief that a global learning model is
important and can serve student needs after graduation. Naturally, the very activities
which contribute to our first objective (knowledge) such as study abroad, global
internships, and global content courses also contribute to the second and third objectives.
Hence, while we separate global learning into three discrete objectives for purposes of
pedagogical clarity, they are, in fact, interconnected and operate simultaneously.
Our third category of learning outcomes seeks to shape student attitudes and
enhance global citizenship. This objective is one that employers in the above-mentioned
surveys failed to mention perhaps because they see less practical relevance to their
corporations and already believe that graduates adequately exhibit “social responsibility.”
In the “How Should Colleges Assess And Improve Student Learning?” survey, employer
respondents believed that 79 percent of graduates are prepared in the area of social
responsibility (Assoc. of American Colleges and Universities 2006b, 3). A further
breakdown of the data reveals that respondents believed that 35 percent of graduates are
“very well prepared” in the social responsibility category while only 18 percent were
“very well prepared” in global knowledge. Clearly colleges and universities have more
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