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Active Learning and Globalization: Creating a Class and Assessing Student Learning
Unformatted Document Text:  Appendix C: Course Syllabus Critical Analysis: Globalization: Good or Evil? Course Description In 1999, thousands of people from around the world protested a meeting of the World Trade Organization in Seattle, shutting down the city by blocking traffic, smashing in storefronts, and vandalizing public places. Since then, such demonstrations have become commonplace at high-level international economic meetings, as we just saw at this summer’s G-8 Summit meeting in Germany. Why? The protestors believe globalization is evil, and that it must be stopped. Yet a recent poll shows that most ordinary Americans believe globalization benefits the country. And the World Bank argues that globalization reduces poverty and increases overall welfare throughout the world. Is globalization good or is it evil? We will begin by figuring out what globalization is – not an easy question to answer. We’ll then try to assess the impact of globalization by considering three specific cases: McDonald’s, movies, climate change. McDonald’s has become a symbol of globalization, changing societies all over the world economically and culturally. Movies go both ways – Hollywood blockbusters play from Berlin to Bangkok, but foreign films play every week in movie theaters across the United States. Climate change is an important environmental consequence of globalization, and one that requires a global solution. All three of these cases provide insight into the economic, cultural, environmental, and political aspects of globalization, and help us understand the benefits and costs associated with it. Course Objectives While this course is centered on the topic of globalization, you needn’t be a potential social scientist to participate. Instead, we will use the study of globalization as a means to develop essential writing skills. As a result, you will be reading less than a hundred pages a week, but you will spend a lot of time drafting paper ideas, doing research, writing, and revising. Over the course of the semester, you will write three different kinds of papers: a discussion paper on the costs and benefits of globalization, an editorial on an aspect of globalization currently in the news, and a research paper on an element of globalization that is particularly interesting to you. In writing these papers, you will learn to frame compelling questions, find and evaluate information, document your sources, construct your own argument, consider alternative explanations, and engage your reader in your work: all skills necessary for writing at Scripps regardless of discipline. Some of the required texts in this course may be personally offensive, or otherwise disturbing. It is therefore essential that each of you express your opinions about the texts and the ideas of your peers as honestly and as respectfully as you can; similarly, you must remain open-minded and thoughtful in your approach to our course texts. Required Texts Available at the Huntley BookstoreManfred Steger. Globalization: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2003.Peter Singer. One World: The Ethics of Globalization. 2 nd Edition. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2004.Andrew Dessler and Edward Parson. The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change: A Guide to the Debate. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2006.These books are also on reserve at Honnold/Mudd Library. Diana Hacker. A Pocket Style Manual. 4 th ed. Boston, MA: Bedford/St Martin’s, 2004. Course Packet. Available from Writing Program Secretary Catherine D’Emilio, Vita Nova 108.

Authors: Bromley, Pamela.
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Appendix C: Course Syllabus
Critical Analysis:
Globalization: Good or Evil?
Course Description
In 1999, thousands of people from around the world protested a meeting of the
World Trade Organization in Seattle, shutting down the city by blocking traffic, smashing in
storefronts, and vandalizing public places. Since then, such demonstrations have become
commonplace at high-level international economic meetings, as we just saw at this
summer’s G-8 Summit meeting in Germany. Why? The protestors believe globalization is
evil, and that it must be stopped. Yet a recent poll shows that most ordinary Americans
believe globalization benefits the country. And the World Bank argues that globalization
reduces poverty and increases overall welfare throughout the world.
Is globalization good or is it evil? We will begin by figuring out what globalization is
not an easy question to answer. We’ll then try to assess the impact of globalization by
considering three specific cases: McDonald’s, movies, climate change. McDonald’s has
become a symbol of globalization, changing societies all over the world economically and
culturally. Movies go both ways – Hollywood blockbusters play from Berlin to Bangkok, but
foreign films play every week in movie theaters across the United States. Climate change is
an important environmental consequence of globalization, and one that requires a global
solution. All three of these cases provide insight into the economic, cultural, environmental,
and political aspects of globalization, and help us understand the benefits and costs
associated with it.
Course Objectives
While this course is centered on the topic of globalization, you needn’t be a potential
social scientist to participate. Instead, we will use the study of globalization as a means to
develop essential writing skills. As a result, you will be reading less than a hundred pages a
week, but you will spend a lot of time drafting paper ideas, doing research, writing, and
revising. Over the course of the semester, you will write three different kinds of papers: a
discussion paper on the costs and benefits of globalization, an editorial on an aspect of
globalization currently in the news, and a research paper on an element of globalization that
is particularly interesting to you. In writing these papers, you will learn to frame compelling
questions, find and evaluate information, document your sources, construct your own
argument, consider alternative explanations, and engage your reader in your work: all skills
necessary for writing at Scripps regardless of discipline.
Some of the required texts in this course may be personally offensive, or otherwise
disturbing. It is therefore essential that each of you express your opinions about the texts
and the ideas of your peers as honestly and as respectfully as you can; similarly, you must
remain open-minded and thoughtful in your approach to our course texts.
Required Texts
Available at the Huntley Bookstore
Manfred Steger. Globalization: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford, UK: Oxford University
Press, 2003.
Peter Singer. One World: The Ethics of Globalization. 2
nd
Edition. New Haven, CT: Yale
University Press, 2004.
Andrew Dessler and Edward Parson. The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change: A
Guide to the Debate. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
These books are also on reserve at Honnold/Mudd Library.
Diana Hacker. A Pocket Style Manual. 4
th
ed. Boston, MA: Bedford/St Martin’s, 2004.
Course Packet. Available from Writing Program Secretary Catherine D’Emilio, Vita Nova 108.


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