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Teaching and Learning Global Political Economy for Undergraduates
Unformatted Document Text:  the Bottom Up. This simulation begins where the employability profile ends. It asks students to “draw” their location in the global economy. I have retained, with permission of students, these drawings as they provide evidence in support of learning that has been ‘internationalizing’. This simulation examines transnational corporations, “free trade,” and the role of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Students simulate a true-to-life struggle that erupts when a firm located in Southern California announces it will close a US factory and move to Mexico. The scenarios in this simulation address structural adjustments, immigration and pesticide regulation. It includes community groups, a city council, labor organizations, laborers and immigrants. By this time students understand the importance of viewing the global economy from the vantage point of the ordinary citizen, and not just the nation-state. This participatory game is scheduled for the end of the semester and provides students with an opportunity to apply concepts and knowledge learned through the semester. The last week of the semester students present Scenario Plan and Poster. Based on semester research project, students work in groups to create a scenario for the global economy in the short term future. Each group examines variables, especially those that are ‘contingent’ and often not taken into account. They create a poster based on the scenario and post this online during the last two weeks of the semester. The Scenario predicts the most likely course the world economy will take given the key global economic issue studied by the group. The projection is for a decade into the future and is a fun exercise that takes students away from textbook analysis to consider aspects and variable normally not included in our accounts. Students follow a model I illustrate this Bhatti APSA T and L 2/08 13

Authors: Bhatti, Robina.
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the Bottom Up. This simulation begins where the employability profile ends. It asks
students to “draw” their location in the global economy. I have retained, with permission
of students, these drawings as they provide evidence in support of learning that has been
‘internationalizing’. This simulation examines transnational corporations, “free trade,”
and the role of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Students
simulate a true-to-life struggle that erupts when a firm located in Southern California
announces it will close a US factory and move to Mexico. The scenarios in this
simulation address structural adjustments, immigration and pesticide regulation. It
includes community groups, a city council, labor organizations, laborers and immigrants.
By this time students understand the importance of viewing the global economy from the
vantage point of the ordinary citizen, and not just the nation-state. This participatory
game is scheduled for the end of the semester and provides students with an opportunity
to apply concepts and knowledge learned through the semester.
The last week of the semester students present Scenario Plan and Poster. Based
on semester research project, students work in groups to create a scenario for the global
economy in the short term future. Each group examines variables, especially those that
are ‘contingent’ and often not taken into account. They create a poster based on the
scenario and post this online during the last two weeks of the semester. The Scenario
predicts the most likely course the world economy will take given the key global
economic issue studied by the group. The projection is for a decade into the future and is
a fun exercise that takes students away from textbook analysis to consider aspects and
variable normally not included in our accounts. Students follow a model I illustrate this
Bhatti APSA T and L 2/08
13


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