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Structuring a Department-Level Assessment Regime
Unformatted Document Text:  6 Classroom Assessment Techniques Students must first determine what type of problem they are dealing with. Students are then asked to synthesize their answers to the individual questions into one summary sentence. Focus can vary to include activities such as a lecture, a discussion, a homework assignment, or a film. Students write responses on index cards or half-sheets of paper and hand them in. May require students to write short answers, circle correct responses to multiple choice questions, or both. Students are provided with a few problems and then asked to state the principle that best applies to each problem. Students are first asked to answer “who, what, when, where, how, and why” questions about a given topic. Students are asked to jot down a quick response to one question: “What was the muddiest point in _______?” Students are asked to respond briefly to some variation of the following two questions:“What was the most important thing you learned during this class?” and “What important questions remain unanswered?”. Short survey prepared by instructors for use at the beginning of a course, at the start of a new lesson or prior to introducing an important new topic. This technique focuses on one aspect of problem solving. Challenges students to synthesize individual answers into one, long, grammatically correct sentence. Extremely simple and efficient technique. Provides a high information return for a low investment of time and energy. Most popular CAT among college teachers. Designed to collect specific feedback on students’ prior learning. What’s the Principle One Sentence Summary Muddiest Point Minute Paper Background Knowledge Probe Five Frequently-Used Examples

Authors: Williams, John.
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6
Classroom Assessment Techniques
Students must first
determine what type of
problem they are dealing
with.
Students are then asked to
synthesize their answers to
the individual questions
into one summary
sentence.
Focus can vary to include
activities such as a lecture, a
discussion, a homework
assignment, or a film.
Students write responses on
index cards or half-sheets of
paper and hand them in.
May require students to write
short answers, circle correct
responses to multiple choice
questions, or both.
Students are provided
with a few problems and
then asked to state the
principle that best
applies to each problem.
Students are first asked to
answer “who, what, when,
where, how, and why”
questions about a given
topic.
Students are asked to jot
down a quick response to
one question: “What was the
muddiest point in _______?”
Students are asked to respond
briefly to some variation of the
following two questions:
“What was the most important
thing you learned during this
class?” and “What important
questions remain
unanswered?”.
Short survey prepared by
instructors for use at the
beginning of a course, at the
start of a new lesson or prior to
introducing an important new
topic.
This technique focuses
on one aspect of
problem solving.
Challenges students to
synthesize individual
answers into one, long,
grammatically correct
sentence.
Extremely simple and
efficient technique. Provides
a high information return for
a low investment of time and
energy.
Most popular CAT among
college teachers.
Designed to collect specific
feedback on students’ prior
learning.
What’s the Principle
One Sentence Summary
Muddiest Point
Minute Paper
Background Knowledge
Probe
Five Frequently-Used Examples


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