All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Violent Social Control: A Framework for Research
Unformatted Document Text:  Peace Research Institute Frankfurt  Draft Leimenrode 29, 60322 Frankfurt, Germany,  ## email not listed ## In   all   societies   violence   is   differentiated   according   to   varying   grades   of  legitimacy – dependent on the aims to which it is employed, to the persons  employing violence, to they type and severity of its use and so forth. There exists  no   society,   in   which   violence   is   not   an   accepted   means   of   social   control,  however, each society circumscribes its use with respect to space, time, agents  and forms. 3  Out of this process results the category of legitimate violence, which,  however, need not be connected to the state. Max Weber argues, that the state is  based on a non­reducible end in itself:  “Upholding   (or   reorganization)   of   the   domestic   and   external   distribution   of violence and power. […] The appeal to the naked violence of the means of coercion towards the outside, but also towards the inside is absolutely essential to any   political   association.   …  the  ‘state’  is  that  association,  which  claims   the monopoly of legitimate violence – it can’t be defined otherwise” (Weber 1973, 453; emphasis in original) 4 Webers argument does not mean that the state actually holds a monopoly, but,  that he claims the monopoly. Actually the idea of the state implies, that there can  be no other agent, who legitimizes the use of force/violence. Agents of legitimate  violence may be private ones, however, their legitimacy derives from the state.  We argue, that in many countries of the world this very idea of the superior  rule­making   state   is   not   accepted   unequivocally,   but   has   to   compete   with  different understandings, which accord a significant lower place to the state.  They do not necessarily believe in the fiction that their legitimacy for rule­setting  and rule­enforcement might be dependent on the state.  Likewise the state might claim the monopoly of legitimate violence, however,  in many states, the claim differs sharply from observable practice insofar as  violent social control is very often practiced by non­state actors. Beyond this gulf  between theoretical claim to supremacy and empirical reality there is another one  between the claim and competing counter­claims, which deny the validity of the  3   There need not be unanimity on the legitimacy of various forms, agents or uses of social control  violence. Most often there is a broad agreement on the largest part, however, there is definitely always disagreement on specific aspects. The degree and specifics of agreement and dissent with respect to the legitimate uses of violence for purposes of social control is an important empirical one, as it pertains to the normative homogeneity vs. fragmentation of a given society and the relative structuration of the state­society divide.  4   My translation. The original goes: „... der Erhaltung (oder Umgestaltung) der inneren und äußeren  Gewaltverteilung. [...] Der Appell an die nackte Gewaltsamkeit der Zwangsmittel nach außen nicht nur, sondern  auch  nach   innen ist  jedem  politischen  Verband  schlechthin  wesentlich.   [...]  der ‚Staat’ ist derjenige Verband, der das Monopol legitimer Gewaltsamkeit in Anspruch nimmt – anders ist er nicht zu definieren.“ (Max Weber (1973).Richtungen und Stufen religiöser Weltablehnung. In: ders.. Soziologie, Universalgeschichtliche Analysen, Politik, Stuttgart (Kröner), 441­483, citation: 453.  7

Authors: Kreuzer, Peter.
first   previous   Page 7 of 39   next   last



background image
Peace Research Institute Frankfurt 
Draft
Leimenrode 29, 60322 Frankfurt, Germany, 
## email not listed ##
In   all   societies   violence   is   differentiated   according   to   varying   grades   of 
legitimacy – dependent on the aims to which it is employed, to the persons 
employing violence, to they type and severity of its use and so forth. There exists 
no   society,   in   which   violence   is   not   an   accepted   means   of   social   control, 
however, each society circumscribes its use with respect to space, time, agents 
and forms.
 Out of this process results the category of legitimate violence, which, 
however, need not be connected to the state. Max Weber argues, that the state is 
based on a non­reducible end in itself: 
“Upholding   (or   reorganization)   of   the   domestic   and   external   distribution   of 
violence and power. […] The appeal to the naked violence of the means of 
coercion towards the outside, but also towards the inside is absolutely essential to 
any   political   association.   …  the  ‘state’  is  that  association,  which  claims   the 
monopoly of legitimate violence – it can’t be defined otherwise” (Weber 1973, 
453; emphasis in original)
Webers argument does not mean that the state actually holds a monopoly, but, 
that he claims the monopoly. Actually the idea of the state implies, that there can 
be no other agent, who legitimizes the use of force/violence. Agents of legitimate 
violence may be private ones, however, their legitimacy derives from the state. 
We argue, that in many countries of the world this very idea of the superior 
rule­making   state   is   not   accepted   unequivocally,   but   has   to   compete   with 
different understandings, which accord a significant lower place to the state. 
They do not necessarily believe in the fiction that their legitimacy for rule­setting 
and rule­enforcement might be dependent on the state. 
Likewise the state might claim the monopoly of legitimate violence, however, 
in many states, the claim differs sharply from observable practice insofar as 
violent social control is very often practiced by non­state actors. Beyond this gulf 
between theoretical claim to supremacy and empirical reality there is another one 
between the claim and competing counter­claims, which deny the validity of the 
3
  There need not be unanimity on the legitimacy of various forms, agents or uses of social control 
violence. Most often there is a broad agreement on the largest part, however, there is definitely always 
disagreement on specific aspects. The degree and specifics of agreement and dissent with respect to the 
legitimate uses of violence for purposes of social control is an important empirical one, as it pertains to 
the normative homogeneity vs. fragmentation of a given society and the relative structuration of the state­
society divide. 
4
  My translation. The original goes: „... der Erhaltung (oder Umgestaltung) der inneren und äußeren 
Gewaltverteilung. [...] Der Appell an die nackte Gewaltsamkeit der Zwangsmittel nach außen nicht nur, 
sondern  auch  nach   innen ist  jedem  politischen  Verband  schlechthin  wesentlich.   [...]  der ‚Staat’ ist 
derjenige Verband, der das Monopol legitimer Gewaltsamkeit in Anspruch nimmt – anders ist er nicht zu 
definieren.“ (Max Weber (1973).Richtungen und Stufen religiöser Weltablehnung. In: ders.. Soziologie, 
Universalgeschichtliche Analysen, Politik, Stuttgart (Kröner), 441­483, citation: 453. 
7


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 7 of 39   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.