Citation

How Does Terrorism Work? Perceived Likelihood of Future Terrorism and 9/11-Related Distress Predict Anti-terrorism Policy Preferences

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

Are public views on anti-terrorism policies driven by concerns about future threats or by emotional responses to a prior attack? A terrorist attack on the scale of 9/11 is both a harbinger of future threat and a discrete, one-time national trauma. We sought to distinguish between a) perceptions of the future threat of terrorism and b) responses to the 9/11 attacks themselves as predictors of Americans’ national security policy preferences. Using an anonymous Web-based survey methodology, we surveyed a nationally representative sample of US adults (N=1613, 75% response rate) in late 2006 and early 2007. Respondents rated the likelihood of another terrorist attack occurring on U.S. soil in the near future. They also reported any experience of terror-related posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTS) in the form of intrusive thoughts and images resulting from 9/11. In addition, respondents expressed their degree of support for anti-terrorism policies in three ways: 1) as having desired an aggressive U.S. response to 9/11, 2) as support for ongoing military involvement in Afghanistan and Iraq, and 3) as willingness to sacrifice civil liberties for security. Multiple regression analyses adjusting for political affiliation, general psychological distress, exposure to 9/11, and other key variables revealed that both perceived likelihood of future terrorism and 9/11-related PTS independently predicted greater support for all three categories of anti-terrorism policies. Moreover, perceived likelihood and PTS interacted such that perceived likelihood of future terrorism did not predict policy preferences among individuals high in PTS. Public views on future-oriented policies may be disproportionately influenced by distressing experiences from the past.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

polici (106), 9/11 (80), terror (72), attitud (51), distress (42), associ (41), attack (38), support (36), stress (30), risk (27), 1 (26), use (26), individu (25), j (23), p (23), intrus (23), studi (22), variabl (22), aggress (22), psycholog (21), r (21),
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES
URL:
http://www.isanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251494_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Poulin, Michael., Cohen Silver, Roxane. and Blum, Scott. "How Does Terrorism Work? Perceived Likelihood of Future Terrorism and 9/11-Related Distress Predict Anti-terrorism Policy Preferences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2016-06-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251494_index.html>

APA Citation:

Poulin, M. , Cohen Silver, R. and Blum, S. , 2008-03-26 "How Does Terrorism Work? Perceived Likelihood of Future Terrorism and 9/11-Related Distress Predict Anti-terrorism Policy Preferences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA Online <PDF>. 2016-06-07 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251494_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Are public views on anti-terrorism policies driven by concerns about future threats or by emotional responses to a prior attack? A terrorist attack on the scale of 9/11 is both a harbinger of future threat and a discrete, one-time national trauma. We sought to distinguish between a) perceptions of the future threat of terrorism and b) responses to the 9/11 attacks themselves as predictors of Americans’ national security policy preferences. Using an anonymous Web-based survey methodology, we surveyed a nationally representative sample of US adults (N=1613, 75% response rate) in late 2006 and early 2007. Respondents rated the likelihood of another terrorist attack occurring on U.S. soil in the near future. They also reported any experience of terror-related posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTS) in the form of intrusive thoughts and images resulting from 9/11. In addition, respondents expressed their degree of support for anti-terrorism policies in three ways: 1) as having desired an aggressive U.S. response to 9/11, 2) as support for ongoing military involvement in Afghanistan and Iraq, and 3) as willingness to sacrifice civil liberties for security. Multiple regression analyses adjusting for political affiliation, general psychological distress, exposure to 9/11, and other key variables revealed that both perceived likelihood of future terrorism and 9/11-related PTS independently predicted greater support for all three categories of anti-terrorism policies. Moreover, perceived likelihood and PTS interacted such that perceived likelihood of future terrorism did not predict policy preferences among individuals high in PTS. Public views on future-oriented policies may be disproportionately influenced by distressing experiences from the past.


Similar Titles:
Continuity and Change in Support for Civil Liberties after the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks: Results of a Panel Study

Children’s beliefs about relational aggression: Associations with aggressive behavior and psychological maladjustment in Japan.


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.