All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

The Domestic Effects of Terrorism: A Case Study of the Impact of Palestinian Terrorism on Israeli Society during the Second Intifada
Unformatted Document Text:  2 Abstract The vast majority of analyses of terrorism within the academic and policy communities concern counter-terrorism and the objectives and tactics of terrorist groups. Far less attention has been paid to the question of the impact of terrorist attacks on targeted societies. In an effort to fill this gap, therefore, this paper examines the domestic effects of terrorism using Israel as a case study. Specifically, this paper investigates the impact of Palestinian suicide terrorism on Israeli society during the second Intifada. Suicide terror attacks within Israel perpetrated by Palestinian militants skyrocketed following the outbreak of the second Intifada in September 2000. In order to answer the question of what impact this wave of suicide terrorism had upon Israeli society, this paper draws upon work conducted by researchers in a number of different disciplines (psychology, sociology, economics, and political science). By using Israel as a case study, and employing a multidisciplinary approach, the paper attempts to derive broader insights about the wide-ranging domestic effects of terrorism. While the number and frequency of suicide terror attacks in Israel during the second Intifada is unparalleled, the use of suicide attacks by terrorist groups is on the rise worldwide. It is certainly timely therefore to investigate the domestic effects of suicide terror attacks. Introduction At a time when terrorist attacks and thwarted plots regularly dominate the news headlines, when long queues at airport security checks have become all-too-common, and when once innocuous items (drinks, shoes, backpacks) can become the means of deadly attacks, it is clear that the threat of terrorism hangs over us as never before. 1 Terrorism is currently at the top of the 1 This paper adopts the U.S. State Department’s definition of terrorism as “premeditated, politically motivated violence perpetrated against noncombatant targets by subnational groups or clandestine agents, usually intended to influence an audience,” see <http://www.state.gov/s/ct/rls/crt/2000/2419.htm>. This definition is consistent with that used by many scholars of terrorism. See, for example, Robert A. Pape, “The Strategic Logic of Suicide

Authors: Waxman, Dov.
first   previous   Page 2 of 28   next   last



background image
2
Abstract
The vast majority of analyses of terrorism within the academic and policy communities concern
counter-terrorism and the objectives and tactics of terrorist groups. Far less attention has been
paid to the question of the impact of terrorist attacks on targeted societies. In an effort to fill this
gap, therefore, this paper examines the domestic effects of terrorism using Israel as a case study.
Specifically, this paper investigates the impact of Palestinian suicide terrorism on Israeli society
during the second Intifada. Suicide terror attacks within Israel perpetrated by Palestinian
militants skyrocketed following the outbreak of the second Intifada in September 2000. In order
to answer the question of what impact this wave of suicide terrorism had upon Israeli society,
this paper draws upon work conducted by researchers in a number of different disciplines
(psychology, sociology, economics, and political science). By using Israel as a case study, and
employing a multidisciplinary approach, the paper attempts to derive broader insights about the
wide-ranging domestic effects of terrorism. While the number and frequency of suicide terror
attacks in Israel during the second Intifada is unparalleled, the use of suicide attacks by terrorist
groups is on the rise worldwide. It is certainly timely therefore to investigate the domestic
effects of suicide terror attacks.
Introduction
At a time when terrorist attacks and thwarted plots regularly dominate the news headlines, when
long queues at airport security checks have become all-too-common, and when once innocuous
items (drinks, shoes, backpacks) can become the means of deadly attacks, it is clear that the
threat of terrorism hangs over us as never before.
Terrorism is currently at the top of the
1
This paper adopts the U.S. State Department’s definition of terrorism as “premeditated, politically motivated
violence perpetrated against noncombatant targets by subnational groups or clandestine agents, usually intended to
influence an audience,” see <http://www.state.gov/s/ct/rls/crt/2000/2419.htm>. This definition is consistent with
that used by many scholars of terrorism. See, for example, Robert A. Pape, “The Strategic Logic of Suicide


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 2 of 28   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.