Citation

Choice, Attention, and Reception in Political Communication Research: The Experimental Study of Selective Exposure

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

Experimental political communication research focuses on understanding media effects given reception. Theoretically, persuasion is a function of the probability an individual receives a given communication and their probability of yielding to what is received (Zaller 1992). However, experimentalists have paid little attention to whether people attend to political information, especially given the availability of so many choices in our complex media environment.
Political scientists with observational research designs recognize that new media choices allow people with less interest in politics to tune out political information (Prior 2005). Nonetheless, it is difficult to use observational designs to discern the effects of media choice because people select what they consume based on preferences that may be related to their political views or shape reactions to political stimuli.
We investigate the political implications of media by revisiting the Videomalaise hypothesis (Mutz and Reeves 2005), which asserts televised incivility reduces trust in officials. Our experimental design allows subjects in one treatment group to change the channel, giving them the option to watch rancorous political debate or something else. The availability of alternatives to political information mutes its effects via at least two mechanisms: Individuals who choose to watch political debate are unaffected by incivility, while those who opt out of watching simply do not see the incivility in question. In addition to this pilot study, we discuss additional research that we will undertake in the late summer, which extends our theoretical model and experimental design to the study of media priming and attitude polarization.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

polit (228), effect (90), televis (83), watch (79), subject (72), choic (68), particip (66), program (65), media (61), show (60), condit (54), research (51), exposur (51), trust (48), treatment (46), inform (46), view (43), group (42), among (39), channel (39), experi (38),

Author's Keywords:

selective exposure, selective reception, media effects, videomalaise, experimental design
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ISPP 31st Annual Scientific Meeting
URL:
http://ispp.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p254833_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Arceneaux, Kevin. and Johnson, Martin. "Choice, Attention, and Reception in Political Communication Research: The Experimental Study of Selective Exposure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 31st Annual Scientific Meeting, Sciences Po, Paris, France, Jul 09, 2008 <Not Available>. 2013-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p254833_index.html>

APA Citation:

Arceneaux, K. and Johnson, M. , 2008-07-09 "Choice, Attention, and Reception in Political Communication Research: The Experimental Study of Selective Exposure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 31st Annual Scientific Meeting, Sciences Po, Paris, France Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2013-12-14 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p254833_index.html

Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Abstract: Experimental political communication research focuses on understanding media effects given reception. Theoretically, persuasion is a function of the probability an individual receives a given communication and their probability of yielding to what is received (Zaller 1992). However, experimentalists have paid little attention to whether people attend to political information, especially given the availability of so many choices in our complex media environment.
Political scientists with observational research designs recognize that new media choices allow people with less interest in politics to tune out political information (Prior 2005). Nonetheless, it is difficult to use observational designs to discern the effects of media choice because people select what they consume based on preferences that may be related to their political views or shape reactions to political stimuli.
We investigate the political implications of media by revisiting the Videomalaise hypothesis (Mutz and Reeves 2005), which asserts televised incivility reduces trust in officials. Our experimental design allows subjects in one treatment group to change the channel, giving them the option to watch rancorous political debate or something else. The availability of alternatives to political information mutes its effects via at least two mechanisms: Individuals who choose to watch political debate are unaffected by incivility, while those who opt out of watching simply do not see the incivility in question. In addition to this pilot study, we discuss additional research that we will undertake in the late summer, which extends our theoretical model and experimental design to the study of media priming and attitude polarization.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available ISPP 31st Annual Scientific Meeting
Associated Document Available Political Research Online
Abstract Only All Academic Inc.

Document Type: application/pdf
Page count: 30
Word count: 10496
Text sample:
Choice Attention and Reception in Political Communication Research Kevin Arceneaux Assistant Professor Department of Political Science Temple University Philadelphia PA (USA) kevin.arceneaux@temple.edu Martin Johnson Associate Professor Department of Political Science University of California Riverside Riverside CA (USA) martin.johnson@ucr.edu For the International Society of Political Psychology Conference July 9-12 2008 Paris France Project overview Experimental political communication research focuses on understanding media effects given reception. Theoretically persuasion is a function of the probability an individual receives a given communication and
Exposure to Television.” In Dolf Zillman and Jennings Bryant eds. Selective Exposure to Communication. Hillsdale NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Zaller John. 1992. The Nature and Origins of Mass Opinion. New York: Cambridge University Press. Zillman Dolf Richad T. Hezel and Norman J. Medoff. 1980. “The Effect of Affective States on Selective Exposure to Televised Entertainment Fare.” Journal of Applied Social Psychology 10(4):323-339. Zillman Dolf and Jennings Bryant. 1985. “Selective-Exposure Phenomena.” In Dolf Zillman and Jennings Bryant eds. Selective Exposure


Similar Titles:
Exposure to Political Information in New and Old Media: Which Impact on Political Participation?

The Polarizing Effects of News Preference on Political Learning and Participation in a High-Choice Media Environment


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.