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Masculinity and the American Dream in American Dreams: Jack Pryor as the Fatherly Scapegoat

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Abstract:

It seems unConventional not to see masculinity in terms of men, but the masculine desire for success in the public sphere is not just limited to men. Through what is now centuries of struggle, women have begun making strides to the point that a woman can be considered a leading candidate for President. However, while women have been crafting their places outside the home, very few men have attempted the inverse. Instead of a changed definition, culture has normalized the masculine ideal of success through the mythology of the American Dream.
The narrative of the American Dream has become all too familiar. A person rises up from poor or unfortunate circumstances to attain wealth and prosperity. Their life stands as another testimonial to the opportunities open to a person in America. This version of success has become second nature to Americans, but it presents some very important difficulties.
Through an analysis of the television program American Dreams, this essay will examine the implications of embracing the virtue of the masculine tale of success. The Pryor family in American Dreams took the viewer back to the beginnings of second wave feminism and explored the collective memory of what women had to overcome in their search for the American Dream. Unfortunately, one of those obstacles often lived in their very home. Jack Pryor, the father, represented a growing trend in television drama in that, as a man, he bore the blame for masculinist ideologies. He was the scapegoat for the perpetuation of the traditional masculine power structures by which Americans judge success.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

american (93), jack (92), father (90), dream (88), televis (58), masculin (54), famili (53), produc (47), execut (45), j.j (42), d (40), helen (38), scapegoat (35), meg (34), 2002 (32), pryor (32), success (31), episod (31), new (26), semel (25), seri (25),

Author's Keywords:

American Dream, Success, Masculinity, Gender, Hegemony, Power
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Association:
Name: NCA 94th Annual Convention
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http://www.natcom.org


Citation:
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MLA Citation:

Herbig, Arthur. "Masculinity and the American Dream in American Dreams: Jack Pryor as the Fatherly Scapegoat" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p256667_index.html>

APA Citation:

Herbig, A. W. , 2008-11-20 "Masculinity and the American Dream in American Dreams: Jack Pryor as the Fatherly Scapegoat" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p256667_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: It seems unConventional not to see masculinity in terms of men, but the masculine desire for success in the public sphere is not just limited to men. Through what is now centuries of struggle, women have begun making strides to the point that a woman can be considered a leading candidate for President. However, while women have been crafting their places outside the home, very few men have attempted the inverse. Instead of a changed definition, culture has normalized the masculine ideal of success through the mythology of the American Dream.
The narrative of the American Dream has become all too familiar. A person rises up from poor or unfortunate circumstances to attain wealth and prosperity. Their life stands as another testimonial to the opportunities open to a person in America. This version of success has become second nature to Americans, but it presents some very important difficulties.
Through an analysis of the television program American Dreams, this essay will examine the implications of embracing the virtue of the masculine tale of success. The Pryor family in American Dreams took the viewer back to the beginnings of second wave feminism and explored the collective memory of what women had to overcome in their search for the American Dream. Unfortunately, one of those obstacles often lived in their very home. Jack Pryor, the father, represented a growing trend in television drama in that, as a man, he bore the blame for masculinist ideologies. He was the scapegoat for the perpetuation of the traditional masculine power structures by which Americans judge success.


Similar Titles:
Examining African American Masculinity, Fatherhood and Media Depictions of African American Fathers & Families

To Be A Man: An Investigation of Masculinity Ideology and Men\'s Family Roles Among and Within African-American, Anglo-American, and Mexican-American Families

The family's child: Kin systems and the crafting of roles for young fathers in low-income African American families


 
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