Citation

Gender Differences in Narratives of Positive Change: Implications for Revised Gender-Specific Reentry Strategies for Female Offenders

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Several studies have found that men and women tend to differ in how they describe life events. As a result of the social construction of gender, men narrate from an independent self-construal while women narrate from an interdependent self-construal (Cross & Madson, 1997). If men and women differ in the way they narrate experiences, they may also differ in the physical & emotional experiences of these events. One of these life experiences, the role transformation process, has become a recent focus in the literature. A sample of 36 individuals was asked about how their lives had changed in a positive way. These individuals identified with one or more of the following stigmatized identities: addict, mental health consumer, offender, or victim of sexual/physical abuse. The survey responses confirmed that women both narrate & experience their transformation process much differently than men. Men tended to refer to external, independent agents, like employment, while most women mentioned intimate social relationships in the transformation narrative. Since dominant paradigms of employment & other reentry treatments were developed for male offenders, the findings suggest a need for reentry strategies for women that focus on reestablishing intimate social relationships to engage women in a successful reentry process.
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p261827_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Herrschaft, Bryn. "Gender Differences in Narratives of Positive Change: Implications for Revised Gender-Specific Reentry Strategies for Female Offenders" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 11, 2008 <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p261827_index.html>

APA Citation:

Herrschaft, B. A. , 2008-11-11 "Gender Differences in Narratives of Positive Change: Implications for Revised Gender-Specific Reentry Strategies for Female Offenders" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p261827_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Several studies have found that men and women tend to differ in how they describe life events. As a result of the social construction of gender, men narrate from an independent self-construal while women narrate from an interdependent self-construal (Cross & Madson, 1997). If men and women differ in the way they narrate experiences, they may also differ in the physical & emotional experiences of these events. One of these life experiences, the role transformation process, has become a recent focus in the literature. A sample of 36 individuals was asked about how their lives had changed in a positive way. These individuals identified with one or more of the following stigmatized identities: addict, mental health consumer, offender, or victim of sexual/physical abuse. The survey responses confirmed that women both narrate & experience their transformation process much differently than men. Men tended to refer to external, independent agents, like employment, while most women mentioned intimate social relationships in the transformation narrative. Since dominant paradigms of employment & other reentry treatments were developed for male offenders, the findings suggest a need for reentry strategies for women that focus on reestablishing intimate social relationships to engage women in a successful reentry process.


Similar Titles:
Changing Narrative Accounts: How Adolescent Males Tell Different Stories when Arrested, Enduring Jail Time and Navigating Community Reentry

Demographic and clinical differences among jail diversion and prison reentry offenders with severe mental illness: Implications for practice and policy

Probation officer perceptions of gender differences in youth offending and implications for practice in the field

Gender Differences in Reentry: Examining the Desistance Process Among Drug-Involved Offenders Across Theoretical Lines

Gender Differences in the Prediction of Juvenile Recidivism: Data from the Positive Achievement Change Tool


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.