All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Balancing Fear: Why Counter-Terror Legislation was Blocked after the Oklahoma City and London Bombings
Unformatted Document Text:  should be tolerated. Blair’s linking of the 7/7 attacks to 9/11 and other terror attacks from around the world, implied a high magnitude of threat. Two weeks after the London bombings, on July 26, 2005, Blair stated that he would not give “one inch” to terrorists and that he sought to confront them on “every level.” He also stated that, “September 11 for me was a wake up call. Do you know what I think the problem is? That a lot of the world woke up for a short time and then turned over and went back to sleep again.” Meanwhile, Conservative Party leader, and head of Blair’s opposition, stated that, “One of the principle objectives of the terrorists is to divide us, one from another. So far … they have failed in that objective. … [W]e believe it is so important that we approach these difficult issues in a spirit of consensus, with the objective of reaching agreement wherever we possibly can” 21 . This speech was Blair’s most urgent yet and it framed the threat as an urgent issue that cannot be ignored. It is important to note that at this stage, Tory rhetoric supported Blair. Three and a half months after the London bombings, on October 13, 2005, Tony Blair unveiled new counterterror legislation that would allow the British government to detain terror suspects for three months without charge, make the glorification or encouragement of terrorism an offense, and outlaw attending terror training camps in the UK or abroad. The proposed bill would have greatly affected free speech in Britain. According to Guardian columnist Seamus Milne, “under the terms of the bill, anyone who voices support for armed resistance to any state or occupation, however repressive or illegitimate, will be committing a criminal offense carrying a seven-year prison 21 “Blair: World slept after 9/11,” CNN.com, 26 July 2005, http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/07/26/london.politicians/index.html. 11

Authors: Rubin, Gabriel.
first   previous   Page 11 of 38   next   last



background image
should be tolerated. Blair’s linking of the 7/7 attacks to 9/11 and other terror attacks
from around the world, implied a high magnitude of threat.
Two weeks after the London bombings, on July 26, 2005, Blair stated that he
would not give “one inch” to terrorists and that he sought to confront them on “every
level.” He also stated that, “September 11 for me was a wake up call. Do you know
what I think the problem is? That a lot of the world woke up for a short time and then
turned over and went back to sleep again.” Meanwhile, Conservative Party leader, and
head of Blair’s opposition, stated that, “One of the principle objectives of the terrorists is
to divide us, one from another. So far … they have failed in that objective. … [W]e
believe it is so important that we approach these difficult issues in a spirit of consensus,
with the objective of reaching agreement wherever we possibly can”
. This speech was
Blair’s most urgent yet and it framed the threat as an urgent issue that cannot be ignored.
It is important to note that at this stage, Tory rhetoric supported Blair.
Three and a half months after the London bombings, on October 13, 2005, Tony
Blair unveiled new counterterror legislation that would allow the British government to
detain terror suspects for three months without charge, make the glorification or
encouragement of terrorism an offense, and outlaw attending terror training camps in the
UK or abroad. The proposed bill would have greatly affected free speech in Britain.
According to Guardian columnist Seamus Milne, “under the terms of the bill, anyone
who voices support for armed resistance to any state or occupation, however repressive or
illegitimate, will be committing a criminal offense carrying a seven-year prison
21
“Blair: World slept after 9/11,” CNN.com, 26 July 2005,
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/07/26/london.politicians/index.html.
11


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 11 of 38   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.